The Condor, Volume 17

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Cooper Ornithological Society., 1915 - Birds
 

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Page 210 - For the scripture saith, Thou shall not muzzle the ox that treadeth out the corn. And, The labourer is worthy of his reward.
Page 160 - Mearns Gilded Flicker (Colaptes chrysoides mearnsi) is abundant throughout this region, and is found in cottonwood and willow groves as well as wherever the giant cactus grows. The giant cactus is to this Flicker and the Gila Woodpecker, what the bamboo is to the inhabitants of some of the eastern islands. The cactus could get along without the flickers, though it probably would not feel properly ventilated without a few nest holes, and it would not look at all natural without them. The cactus furnishes...
Page 159 - ... etc. The old ones would try to get them to eat watermelon placed on the tables, but the babies would not be shown ; the parents had to put it In their mouths. They followed the parents from perch to perch begging for food until I expected to see them chastised. The pair in question stayed with the three juvenals until they had them broken to eat for themselves and then left. After a proper interval they came back with two more young ones, thus indicating that a second brood Is sometimes raised....
Page 108 - A new edition of the Naturalists' Directory has just been published by SE Cassino, Salem, Mass. This directory is invaluable to naturalists since it is the means of bringing together students and collectors in all parts of the world through correspondence. The directory contains an alphabetical list of English speaking professional and amateur naturalists in all parts of the world, also a list of scientific societies and periodicals. The price of the Directory is $2.50 in cloth binding and $2.00...
Page 32 - Island. A marked exception to this rule may be witnessed throughout the summer on the eastern side of Dall Island in Kaigani and Tlivak Straits. Here the tide sets strongly, especially in the region of the narrows of Skookum Chuck at the north end of Dall Island, and with an abundance of floating organisms serving as fish food the conditions are most favorable not only for auklets but for several other water birds, such as gulls, ancient and marbled murrelets, pigeon guillemots, and cormorants. In...
Page 31 - ... mixed with feathers where the hole was enlarged for more room. Prof. Harold Heath (1915) found the rhinoceros auklet breeding still more abundantly on Forrester Island, southern Alaska, during the summer of 1913. He writes : Generally speaking, the rhinoceros auklet occupies burrows in the sloping sides of the island from the shore line to a height of from 400 to 500 feet, their number and distribution depending upon the nature of the soil and the character of the surrounding vegetation. The...
Page 154 - ... leisure. On bird tables I have tried them with various articles of food and found very little that they rejected. They would not eat cantaloupe at all, but were regular watermelon fiends, eating it three times a day and calling for more. They did not care for oranges, and I had no success in trying to teach them to eat ripe pickled olives. I tried the olive diet on them because two mockingbirds in our yard in California learned to eat this fruit. Meat, raw and cooked, was eaten, and they ate...
Page 144 - By Florence Merriam Bailey. Houghton, Mifflin & Co. Price, $3.50. (Technical.) "Bird Homes," By AR Dugmore. Doubleday, Page &Co. (Popular.) "Bird Neighbors," By Neltje Blanchan. Doubleday, Page & Co. (Popular.) "Birds That Hunt and Are Hunted," By Neltje Blanchan. Doubleday, Page & Co. (Popular.) How to Stuff a Bird (By ETS from...
Page 32 - Journey of at least 60 miles if it flies directly over Dall Island. This, however, is doubtful, as flocks have been seen at nightfall coming down the straits on the east side of Dall, and after rounding the southern end their course is doubtless a bee line for home. Under such circumstances It requires a completed Journey of fully 120 miles to bring them to the feeding grounds and back again. Whatever their route, it is certain that they are most rapid flyers, and in the dim evening and morning light...
Page 34 - ... the burrows of the Cassin's auklet and the ancient murrelet. It was accordingly impossible to determine the exact numbers of the two species. It can be said, however, that the Cassin auklet has been found to occupy several sites from the sea level to a height of 500 feet, and the presence of eggshell fragments in many places indicates their general distribution over the island and in small numbers on Lawrie and South Islands. As in the case of the ancient murrelet, the openings of the burrows...

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