The Count of Monte Cristo

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Skyhorse Publishing Company, Incorporated, Aug 1, 2013 - Fiction - 440 pages
30 Reviews
Originally published in 1844, The Count of Monte Cristo is one of the most well-known adventure tales of all time, and its story has formed the basis for dozens of films, television shows and adaptations alone. For nearly a century and a half, Dumas’ book has enjoyed worldwide success and name recognition.

Set in early 19th century France, Edmond Dantès is framed as a Bonapartist traitor, and sentenced to fourteen years in prison. In jail, he befriends a man who tells him of a treasure on the island on Monte Cristo. Following a daring escape, Dantès recovers the treasure and purchases the island as well as the title of Count. Disguised, he uses his new fortune to take revenge on the men who betrayed him.

In this faithful reproduction, The Count of Monte Cristo is published for the first time by Skyhorse Publishing, still proving to be one of the canons of adventure literature. Accompanying the text is a new introduction by New York Times bestselling author Tim Green, whose thriller Exact Revenge is a modern-day retelling of Dumas’s classic. Rediscover the story that Robert Louis Stevenson called “a piece of perfect storytelling.”

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - publiusdb - LibraryThing

It is said to be the worst written classic...and it may be true. But I enjoyed it, most of it, and aside from a various structural problems, I think it merits a read at least once. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - 6boysandme - LibraryThing

Summary: Set in the Napoleanic era, Edmond Dantes is betrayed by an enemy he thought to be his best friend. After a long, miserable imprisonment Edmund is a changed man and now he must decide on ... Read full review

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About the author (2013)

After an idle youth, Alexandre Dumas went to Paris and spent some years writing. A volume of short stories and some farces were his only productions until 1927, when his play Henri III (1829) became a success and made him famous. It was as a storyteller rather than a playwright, however, that Dumas gained enduring success. Perhaps the most broadly popular of French romantic novelists, Dumas published some 1,200 volumes during his lifetime. These were not all written by him, however, but were the works of a body of collaborators known as "Dumas & Co." Some of his best works were plagiarized. For example, The Three Musketeers (1844) was taken from the Memoirs of Artagnan by an eighteenth-century writer, and The Count of Monte Cristo (1845) from Penchet's A Diamond and a Vengeance. At the end of his life, drained of money and sapped by his work, Dumas left Paris and went to live at his son's villa, where he remained until his death.

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