The Crisis of the Old Order, 1919-1933

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Houghton Mifflin, 1988 - History - 557 pages
The Crisis of the Old Order, 1919-1933, volume one of Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and biographer Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. s Age of Roosevelt series, is the first of three books that interpret the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of the early twentieth century in terms of Franklin D. Roosevelt, the spokesman and symbol of the period. Portraying the United States from the Great War to the Great Depression, The Crisis of the Old Order covers the Jazz Age and the rise and fall of the cult of business. For a season, prosperity seemed permanent, but the illusion came to an end when Wall Street crashed in October 1929. Public trust in the wisdom of business leadership crashed too. With a dramatist s eye for vivid detail and a scholar s respect for accuracy, Schlesinger brings to life the era that gave rise to FDR and his New Deal and changed the public face of the United States forever."

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THE CRISIS OF THE OLD ORDER: 1919-1933, The Age Of Roosevelt, Volume I

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In Schlesinger's view, Roosevelt is the summation of an era in American social, political and economic life. He corresponds, in this respect, to Napoleon; anything about him, whether bearing directly ... Read full review

The crisis of the old order, 1919-1933

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While a lot of ink has been spilled profiling FDR, Schlesinger's three-volume work remains among the best efforts. Released in the late 1950s, the trio begins with a broader overview of his early ... Read full review

Contents

1933
1
THE GOLDEN DA
12
IV
15
Copyright

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About the author (1988)

Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. is renowned as a historian, a public intellectual, & a political activist. He served as a special assistant to President John F. Kennedy; won two Pulitzer Prizes, in 1946 for "The Age of Jackson" & in 1966 for "A Thousand Days," & in 1998 was the recipient of the National Humanities Medal. He lives in New York City.

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