The Crown and Its Advisers; Or, Queen, Ministers, Lords and Commons

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William Blackwood & sons, 1870 - Constitutional history - 222 pages
 

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Page 79 - The school-boy whips his taxed top — the beardless youth manages his taxed horse, with a taxed bridle on a taxed road ; — and the dying Englishman pouring his medicine, which has paid seven per cent.
Page 79 - ... raw material, taxes on every fresh value that is added to it by the industry of man; taxes on the sauce which pampers man's appetite and the drug...
Page 191 - May it please your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place but as the House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here; and humbly beg your Majesty's pardon, that I cannot give any other answer than this to what your Majesty is pleased to demand of me.
Page 213 - That the freedom of speech and debates or proceedings in parliament ought not to be impeached or questioned in any court or place out of parliament.
Page 216 - The power and jurisdiction of parliament, says Sir Edward Coke, is so transcendent and absolute that it cannot be confined. either for causes or persons, within any bounds.
Page 218 - ... of despotism, or the licentiousness of unbridled freedom — reconciling power with liberty : not adopting hasty or ill-advised experiments, or pursuing any airy and unsubstantial theories ; but not rejecting, nevertheless, the application of sound and wholesome knowledge to practical affairs, and pressing, with sobriety and caution, into the service of his country any generous and liberal principles, whose excess, indeed, may be dangerous, but whose foundation is in truth.
Page 167 - As long as our sovereign lord the king, and his faithful subjects the Lords and commons of this realm, the triple cord which no man can break...
Page 79 - The school-boy whips his taxed top ; the beardless youth manages his taxed horse with a taxed bridle, on a taxed road ; and the dying Englishman, pouring his medicine, which has paid seven per cent., into a spoon that has paid fifteen per cent., flings himself back upon his chintz bed, which has paid...
Page 9 - Will you to the utmost of your " power maintain the laws of God, the true profession of the " gospel, and the protestant reformed religion established " by the law ? And will you preserve unto the bishops and " clergy of this realm, and to the churches committed to " their charge, all such rights and privileges as by law do " or shall appertain unto them, or any of them ? — King " or queen. All this I promise to do.
Page 79 - His whole property is then immediately taxed from 2 to 10 per cent. Besides the probate, large fees are demanded for burying him in the chancel ; his virtues are handed down to posterity on taxed marble; and he is then gathered to his fathers, to be taxed no more.

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