The Cultural Meaning of Popular Science: Phrenology and the Organization of Consent in Nineteenth-Century Britain

Forsideomslag
Cambridge University Press, 1984 - 418 sider
This study of the popularity of phrenology in the second quarter of the nineteenth century concentrates on the social and ideological functions of science during the consolidation of urban industrial society. It is influenced by Foucault, by recent work in the history and sociology of science, by critical theory, and by cultural anthropology. The author analyses the impact of science on Victorian society across a spectrum from the intellectual establishment to working-class freethinkers and Owenite socialists. In doing so he provides the first extended treatment of the place and role of science among working-class radicals. The book also challenges attempts to establish neat demarcations between scientific ideas and their philosophical, theological and social contexts.
 

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Indhold

Introduction
1
HISTORIOGRAPHY
13
SCIENCE AND SOCIAL INTERESTS
37
The rites of passage
67
POPULAR SCIENCE
99
Secular Methodism
169
RADICAL APPROPRIATION AND CRITIQUE
199
On standing socialism on its head
224
Conclusion
256
public lecturers on phrenology
272
Notes
301
Manuscript sources and public documents
392
General index
411
Copyright

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