The Culture of AIDS in Africa: Hope and Healing Through Music and the Arts

Front Cover
Gregory Barz, Judah Cohen
Oxford University Press, Nov 3, 2011 - Medical - 500 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
The Culture of AIDS in Africa enters into the many worlds of expression brought forth across this vast continent by the ravaging presence of HIV/AIDS. Africans and non-Africans, physicians and social scientists, journalists and documentarians share here a common and essential interest in understanding creative expression in crushing and uncertain times. They investigate and engage the social networks, power relationships, and cultural structures that enable the arts to convey messages of hope and healing, and of knowledge and good counsel to the wider community. And from Africa to the wider world, they bring intimate, inspiring portraits of the performers, artists, communities, and organizations that have shared with them their insights and the sense they have made of their lives and actions from deep within this devastating epidemic. Covering the wide expanse of the African continent, the 30 chapters include explorations of, for example, the use of music to cope with AIDS; the relationship between music, HIV/AIDS, and social change; visual approaches to HIV literacy; radio and television as tools for "edutainment;" several individual artists' confrontations with HIV/AIDS; various performance groups' response to the epidemic; combating HIV/AIDS with local cultural performance; and more. Source material, such as song lyrics and interviews, weaves throughout the collection, and contributions by editors Gregory Baz and Judah Cohen bookend the whole, to bring together a vast array of perspectives and sources into a nuanced and profoundly affective portrayal of the intricate relationship between HIV/AIDS and the arts in Africa.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Culture of AIDS Hope and Healing Through the Arts in Africa
3
Singing for Life Songs of Hope Healing and HIVAIDS in Uganda
20
Documentary Transcript
35
Coping with AIDS through Music in Zimbabwe
56
African Musicians Respond to a Pandemic with Songs of Sorrow Resistance Advocacy and Hope
63
6 Music HIVAIDS and Social Change in Nairobi Kenya
70
Nyimbo za EDZI Songs about AIDS
85
8 Using Music to Combat AIDS and Other Public Health Issues in Malawi
88
Oliver Mtukudzis Songs about HIVAIDS
241
A Challenge to the Aristotelian Theory on Tragedy
256
A Study of Princess Jullys Dunia Mbaya Jack Nyadundos Ukimwi and Oduor Odhialos Nyakomollo
268
Grassroots Organizing and Celebrity Campaigns The Arts and AIDS Activism in Morocco
283
Song and Resilience in a South African Zulu HIVAIDS Struggle
285
A Musical Response to AIDS
299
The Expressive Economy of HIVAIDS in Mbarara Uganda
309
Circus Performance as a Means of HIVAIDS Education in Ethiopia
322

9 Visual Approaches to HIV Literacy in South Africa
94
Combating HIVAIDS Using Local Cultural Performance in Kenya
111
To Sing of AIDS in Uganda
129
12 HIVAIDS Poster Campaigns in Malawi
131
The Case of the Radio Serial Drama Makgabaneng
144
SiyayinqobaBeat It on South African Television
158
Two Case Studies of HIVAIDS Edutainment Campaigns in Francophone Africa
180
Performance Pollution and Ethnomusicology in a NeoLiberal Setting
193
Lets Get Together
213
Gideon Mendel and the Politics of Photographing the HIVAIDS Pandemic in South Africa
215
Singing Traditionally to Overturn Traditional Authority
222
Interview with VOLSET Youth Drama Group
341
29 Kwaito and the Culture of AIDS in South Africa
343
Tafash Twig HIVAIDS and Hip Hop in Uganda
362
Singing HIVAIDS in Malawi 19802008
384
Pluralist Photography and Local Empowerment
404
A TamTam for Africa In Memoriam Mamadou Konté 19452007
427
About the Authors
429
References
437
Notes
469
Index
493
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)


Gregory Barz is Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology, Graduate Dept. of Religion, and African American Studies at Vanderbilt University. His publications include Singing for Life: Music and HIV/AIDS in Uganda (Routledge, 2005); Performing Religion: Negotiating Past and Present in Kwaya Music of Tanzania (Rodopi, 2003), and Shadows in the Field: New Perspectives for Fieldwork in Ethnomusicology, Second Edition (co-editor with Timothy Cooley, OUP, 2008).
Judah M. Cohen is the Lou and Sybil Mervis Professor of Jewish Culture and Assistant Professor of Jewish Studies and Folklore and Ethnomusicology at Indiana University. He is the author of Through the Sands of Time: A History of the Jewish Community of St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands (Brandeis/University Press of New England, 2004).

Bibliographic information