The Cure: How a Father Raised $100 Million--And Bucked the Medical Establishment--In a Quest to Save His Children

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Harper Collins, Aug 29, 2006 - Biography & Autobiography - 352 pages
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The remarkable true story of one father's race against time to found a business that would cure his sick children.

John and Aileen Crowley were on top of the world. With a brand-new Harvard Business School degree, three beautiful children, a new house, and a great job, they thought that they had just entered the best years of life. Then doctors diagnosed their two youngest children with Pompe disease, and everything changed.

Fifteen-month-old Megan and five-month-old Patrick were given only months to live. Pompe disease, the Crowleys were told, was so rare that no company had bothered spending the money needed to sponsor research. There was no cure, no treatment—only the gradual degeneration of muscle so that at the end, the children would be unable to walk, eat, or even breathe on their own. It was a nightmare the Crowleys could hardly comprehend.

But John Crowley refused to accept this death sentence—and in the absence of other options, he made his own. Determined to find scientists who could develop a replacement enzyme that would keep the disease at bay and his children alive, Crowley quit his job as a financial consultant and invested himself and his life savings in a biotechnology start-up company. In just over a year, Novazyme Pharmaceuticals, Inc., went from an endowment of $37,000 to $27 million, and was sold to Genzyme Corp. soon thereafter for a news-breaking $137.5 million. But the struggle wasn't over yet, and scientific setbacks, accusations of conflict of interest, business troubles, and the children's own worsening condition would test the limits of John and Aileen's minds and hearts as they fought towards a cure.

With deft prose and devastating clarity, Pulitzer Prize-winning Wall Street Journal reporter Geeta Anand weaves together the disparate threads of this remarkable story of cutting-edge science; of business acumen and daring; and of the indomitable fighting spirit of a family that refuses to give in.

Heart-wrenching yet triumphant, The Cure takes readers from the boardrooms and laboratories to hospital beds and kindergarten classrooms. With its captivating and ultimately deeply uplifting narrative, The Cure is a wholly American story of commerce and technology, of determination and daring, and of family and the power of a belief in happy endings.

 

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The Cure: How a Father Raised $100 Million--And Bucked the Medical Establishment--In a Quest to Save His Children

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

A Pulitzer Prizewinning reporter for the Wall Street Journal, Anand chronicles the true story of John and Aileen Crowley's struggle to find a cure for Pompe diseasea usually fatal genetic disorder ... Read full review

Review: The Cure: How a Father Raised $100 Million—and Bucked the Medical Establishment—in a Quest to Save His Children

User Review  - Drew - Goodreads

This is simply a MUST read for any parent, medical professional, or anybody with a heart. Read full review

Contents

Prologue
1
VERITAS
7
TROUBLE
15
DIAGNOSIS
23
HOPE
27
GOD DOESNT GIVE YOU MORE THAN YOU CAN HANDLE
41
THE ROAD TO POWER AND INFLUENCE
53
MEGAN
63
FAILURE IS NOT AN OPTION
157
COWBOYS
161
LOSING SUPPORT
177
NOVAZYME TIME
185
MAKING MEMORIES
199
THE BLUFF
209
THE DEAL
223
TOUGH CHOICES
245

Contents
73
THE CONFERENCE
77
THE MARRIAGE
85
SHARON
107
BETTING ON RESEARCH
117
LETS JUST DO IT
131
A ROCKY START
143
THE SIBLING STUDY
269
PLAN B
283
READY TO RUN
297
Afterword
313
Acknowledgments
327
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Geeta Anand is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter and feature writer for the Wall Street Journal. Formerly a political reporter for the Boston Globe, she now specializes in health care, education, and environmental challenges in India. She lives in Mumbai with her husband and two daughters.

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