The Damnation of Theron Ware: Or, Illumination

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Stone & Kimball, 1896 - Belief and doubt - 512 pages
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Page 49 - Doing what we know is not for the glory of God ; as, The putting on of gold and costly apparel. The taking such diversions as cannot be used in the name of the Lord Jesus.
Page 256 - Did you ever see a play? — in a theatre, I mean. I supposed not. But you'll understand when I say that the performance looks one way from where the audience sit, and quite a different way when you are behind the scenes. There you see that the trees and houses are cloth, and the moon is tissue paper, and the flying fairy is a middle-aged woman strung up on a rope. That doesn't prove that the play, out in front, isn't beautiful and affecting, and all that. It only shows that everything in this world...
Page 198 - but " Is your mind well furnished ? " Theron had the sensation of having been invited to become a citizen of this world. The thought so dazzled him that his impulses were dragging him forward to take the new oath of allegiance before he had had time to reflect upon what it was he was abandoning.
Page 416 - Ireland you got a strange mixture of elementary early peoples, walled off from the outer world by the four seas, and free to work out their own racial amalgam on their own lines. They brought with them at the outset a great inheritance of Eastern mysticism. Others lost it, but the Irish, all alone on their island, kept it alive and brooded on it, and rooted their whole spiritual side in it. Their religion is full of it; their blood is full of it — our Celia is fuller of it than anybody else.
Page 66 - The door opened, and Theron saw the priest standing in the doorway with an uplifted hand. He wore now a surplice, with a purple band over his shoulders, and on his pale face there shone a tranquil and tender light. One of the workmen fetched from the stove a brand, lighted the two candles, and bore the table with its contents into the bedroom. The young woman plucked Theron's sleeve, and he dumbly followed her into the chamber of death, making one of the group of a dozen, headed by Mrs. MacEvoy and...
Page 287 - Theron experimented cautiously upon the unaccustomed tobacco, and looked at Celia with what he felt to be the confident quiet of a man of the world. She had thrown aside her hat, and in doing so had half released some of the heavy strands of hair coiled at the back of her head. His glance instinctively rested upon this wonderful hair of hers. There was no mistaking the sudden fascination its disorder had for his eye. She stood before him with the cigarette poised daintily between thumb and finger...
Page 146 - ... He shut down the window when you began to play. His doing so annoyed me, because I — I wanted very much to hear it all. I never heard such music before. I — I came into the church to hear more of it, but then you stopped." " I will play for you some other time," Celia said, answering the regret in his tone. "But to-night I wanted to talk with you instead." She kept silent, in spite of this, so long now that Theron was on the point of jestingly asking when the talk was to begin. Then she put...
Page 76 - It rose now suddenly in front of him, as he sauntered from patch to patch of sunlight under the elms, like some huge, shadowy, and symbolical monument. He looked at it with wondering curiosity, as at something he had heard of all his life, but never seen before,— an abhorrent spectacle, truly! The foundations upon which its dark bulk reared itself were ignorance, squalor, brutality, and vice. Pigs wallowed in the mire before its base, and burrowing into this base were a myriad of narrow doors,...
Page 308 - Winches, was dead. There was an end of him, and good riddance. In his place there had been born a Poet, — he spelled the word out now unabashed, — a child of light, a lover of beauty and sweet sounds, a recognizable brother to Renan and Chopin — and Celia ! Out of the soothing, tenderly grateful revery, a practical suggestion suddenly took shape.
Page 442 - Michael shook his head dogmatically. " That is the greatest pity of all," he said, with renewed earnestness. " You are entirely deceived about yourself. You do not at all realize how you have altered your direction, or where you are going. It was a great misfortune for you, sir, that you did not keep among your own people. That poor half-brother of mine, though the drink was in him when he said that saying to you never spoke a truer word.

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