The Day After Roswell

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Simon and Schuster, Jul 15, 1999 - Fiction - 352 pages
10 Reviews
A landmark exposé firmly grounded in fact, The Day After Roswell puts a 50 year-old controversy to rest. Since 1947, the mysterious crash of an unidentified aircraft at Roswell, New Mexico, has fueled a firestorm of speculation and controversy with no conclusive evidence of its extraterrestrial origin -- until now.
Colonel Philip J. Corso (Ret.), a member of President Eisenhower's National Security Council and former head of the Foreign Technology Desk at the U.S. Army's Research & Development department, has come forward to tell the whole explosive story. Backed by documents newly declassified through the Freedom of Information Act, Colonel Corso reveals for the first time his personal stewardship of alien artifacts from the crash, and discloses the U.S. government's astonishing role in the Roswell incident: what was found, the cover-up, and how these alien artifacts changed the course of 20th century history.

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The day after Roswell

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As the 50th anniversary approaches of the crash of a so-called extraterrestrial craft near Roswell, New Mexico, the UFO conspiracy theory is getting more attention. These latest books approach Roswell ... Read full review

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Fiction?? People are so naive, all of these ex military, ex intelligence officers are simply lying about Roswell crashes?? No, (yes 2 craft went down, our pencil beam radar) having read the book, listened to countless Corso interviews, interviews from the mortician at Roswell, the officer who released the General's press statement "ufo recovered" Jesse Marcel who stated not of this earth, how quickly we moved from vacuum tubes to integrated circuits it is clear to me we were helped!  

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About the author (1999)

Philip Corso served in the United States Army from 1942 to 1963 and earned the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. Corso was on the staff of President Eisenhower‘s National Security Council for four years (1953–1957). In 1961, he became Chief of the Pentagon‘s Foreign Technology desk in Army Research and Development.

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