The Day Dixie Died: Southern Occupation, 1865-1866

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Stackpole Books, 2001 - History - 312 pages
As the North celebrated the end of the Civil War, the people of the South, particularly of recently fallen Richmond, mourned. The South was about to enter a period of extreme turmoil reconstruction. The Union, though preserved, would not easily be healed. Starting with Lincoln's assassination and continuing up through the harsh realities of occupation through the summer of 1866, authors Thomas and Debra Goodrich trace the history of reconstruction in the south-the death, destruction, crime, starvation, exile, and anarchy that pervaded those grim years.
 

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In conducting secondary research for my book, The Rattling of the Chains, a memior about an ancestor, Archer Alexander, the last fugitive slave, I wanted to gain some insight about the living conditions and experience of the people living in the period 1865-1867.
This well researched book by Ms. Goodrich exceeded my purposes. Perhaps leaning to show how one side of the war- the South was treated, it confirmed some antidotal material with traceable quotes as to what happened from a host of personal case stories. I recommend it for background data without any qualifications. But have some reservations on how the book should be read with other materials to gain a balanced insight on the Civil War. Dr. Errol D. Alexander.
 

Contents

I
1
II
3
III
13
IV
21
V
27
VI
33
VII
39
VIII
49
XVI
111
XVII
125
XVIII
137
XIX
147
XX
161
XXI
177
XXII
179
XXIII
193

IX
57
X
65
XI
73
XII
81
XIII
91
XIV
93
XV
103
XXIV
203
XXV
217
XXVI
225
XXVII
239
XXVIII
251
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Page 8 - With malice toward none; with charity for all, with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in ; to bind up the nation's wounds ... to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves, and with all nations.
Page 8 - I am aware, Mr. Trenchard, that you are not used to the manners of good society, and that, alone, will excuse the impertinence of which you have been guilty.
Page 29 - I spent most of the afternoon in a political caucus, held for the purpose of considering the necessity for a new cabinet and a line of policy less conciliatory than that of Mr. Lincoln ; and while everybody was shocked at his murder, the feeling was nearly universal that the accession of Johnson to the Presidency would prove a godsend to the country.
Page 8 - No one need expect he would take any part in hanging or killing these men, even the worst of them. Frighten them out of the country, open the gates, let down the bars, scare them off," said he, throwing up his hands as if scaring sheep.
Page 31 - If this is not accomplished, nothing will be claimed beyond the sum of fifty thousand dollars in advance, which is supposed to be necessary to reach and slaughter the three villains. "I will give, myself, one thousand dollars toward this patriotic purpose. Every one wishing to contribute will address Box X, Cahawba, Alabama. ''December 1, 1864.

About the author (2001)

Veteran Civil War author Thomas Goodrich and his wife, Debra, a freelance journalist, divide their time between their native states of Kansas and Virginia, and speak throughout the country while researching new projects.

Debra Goodrich a freelance journalist divides her time between Kansas and Virginia, and speaks throughout the country while researching new projects.

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