The Deadly Pearl

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Open Road Media, Jul 17, 2012 - Fiction - 153 pages
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Sand attacks the empire of New York’s deadliest pimp

Her name is Rochelle, and she is only fifteen when she disappears. Her father is a secret service agent assigned to ex-president William Baron Clarke, and when he asks for help, Clarke calls the most capable tracker he knows: Robert Sand, the only black man to ever attain the rank of samurai. Sand combs the tenements of New York’s East Village in search of the girl, finally learning what no father ever wants to hear: Rochelle is in the clutches of Pearl, the meanest pimp in town.

Called Pearl because of his exquisite taste in jewelry, he is no ordinary hustler. Kidnapping is his specialty, and the women he snatches for sale overseas are never older than eighteen. He is proud to call his business “white slavery,” but his latest victim may be his last. Robert Sand is coming for him, and all the guns in New York won’t be enough to protect this Pearl from getting scuffed.

 

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Contents

PEARL
THE GIRL
JENNIFER AND 300000
INSTINCT
CLOSER
AMBUSH
MANHUNT
TWO DECLARATIONS OF
BAIT
TRAP
ENTER THE BARON
CHINKS SPECIALTY
RESCUECHALLENGE ACCEPTED
A
RESCUE
DUEL

ASHES AND BULLETS
ANGRY
GOODBYE

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About the author (2012)

Marc Olden (1933–2003) was the author of forty mystery and suspense novels. Born in Baltimore, he began writing while working in New York as a Broadway publicist. His first book, Angela Davis (1973), was a nonfiction study of the controversial Black Panther. In 1973 he also published Narc, under the name Robert Hawke, beginning a hard-boiled nine-book series about a federal narcotics agent.  

A year later, Black Samurai introduced Robert Sand, a martial arts expert who becomes the first non-Japanese student of a samurai master. Based on Olden’s own interest in martial arts, which led him to the advanced ranks of karate and aikido, the novel spawned a successful eight-book series. Olden continued writing for the next three decades, often drawing on his fascination with Japanese culture and history. 

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