The Definitive Guide to Berkeley DB XML

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Apress, Feb 1, 2007 - Computers - 399 pages

This book teaches the basics of XML with an original approach, using real-world examples from an interesting (and operating) environment with broad applicability. It covers the full spectrum of Berkeley DB XML tools, including the command-line shell, transactions, rollbacks, replication, archiving and monitoring. Techniques and concepts that have broad applicability outside of the subject matter are skillfully explained: XML, XPath, XQuery, XML schemas, all industry-standard technologies that find one of their best tutorial treatments, and all in the context of a simple database solution. The book also presents a remarkable example of query power.

 

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If you are building applications using dbxml then this book will be your constant companion. It's full of real world examples that can be immediately used in your code to get you up and running fast. Dbxml is a fantastic product that suffers, like so much other good open source software, from a general lack of documented usage examples. Danny Brian is a true dbxml guru who comes to the rescue. Save yourself a ton of time and effort and get this book as soon as you can. 

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Awesome Document !!!!!! Really helped me ........

Selected pages

Contents

A Quick Look at Berkeley DB XML
1
The Power of an Embedded XML Database
7
Installation and Configuration
25
Getting Started
35
Environments Containers and Documents
47
Indexes
61
XQuery with BDB XML
73
BDB XML with C++
103
BDB XML with Java
141
BDB XML with Perl
161
BDB XML with PHP
177
Managing Databases
191
XML Essentials
199
BDB XML API Reference
231
XQuery Reference
343
Index
355

BDB XML with Python
125

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About the author (2007)

Danny Brian has been programming for over 20 years. Since the advent of Linux and FreeBSD operating systems, his major development interests have been natural language processing, games, and XML technologies. Danny has been a regular speaker at O'Reilly's Open Source Convention since 2001, winning the Damian Conway Award for Technical Excellence in 2001. Formerly a columnist for The Perl Journal, he has recently worked as an analyst and software engineer for NTT/Verio, and is the chief executive officer of an entertainment startup.

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