The Definitive Guide to Building Java Robots

Front Cover
Apress, Nov 7, 2006 - Computers - 420 pages
Notes on Style I admit I was a programmer before I started building robots. So my perspective may be so- what skewed in the direction of a programmer. However, I also didn’t want this book to be from a purely software engineering perspective. I wanted to keep the text balanced between robotics and programming and not get too cute with either discipline, though from time to time I’m afraid I may have indulged myself. Who Should Read This Book If you want off-the-shelf robot components, free software, and development tools, this is the book for you. You can download all the software—it’s GPL (General Public License) or Apache License—and you can purchase the components from your favorite robot supplier and/or hobby shop. The following sections outline the experience you should have to get the most out of the book. Your Programming/Java Experience I could say that you should have a good understanding of object-oriented techniques and Java before getting started with this book, but if you’re like most roboticists, you’ll likely learn as you go, and by following the various examples I’ve included within these pages.
 

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User Review  - sharkfish - LibraryThing

Great Scott! This guy has written a book I can understand on a subject I've always wanted to learn. If you are trying to do more than write code for microcontrollers and want to use your own or someone else's AI library, this could be the book for you. Read full review

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The first great book about programming robotics from your PC. You can get more information about this book at www.scottsbots.com and you can read a non-biased review from robots.net. http://robots.net/article/1868.html

Contents

V
6
VI
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VII
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VIII
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IX
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XLI
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Copyright

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Page 6 - Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler.

About the author (2006)

Scott Preston is a software craftsman and roboticist from Columbus, Ohio. Over the past decade he has worked for some of the largest companies in the world and built & programmed lots of web sites and robots. When he's not working on a new robot or web project, he consults and solves hard problems for customers at his company CodeGin LLC, which he founded in 2010. He is also a renowned speaker and has spoken at many events large and small to promote web development and robotics. You can find out more about Scott by visiting his website: http://www.scottpreston.com or his robot project site http://www.scottsbots.com.

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