The Democratic Paradox

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Verso, 2000 - Philosophy - 143 pages
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From the theory of 'deliberative democracy' to the politics of the 'third way', the present Zeitgeist is characterized by attempts to deny what Chantal Mouffe contends is the inherently conflictual nature of democratic politics. Far from being signs of progress, such ideas constitute a serious threat to democratic institutions. Taking issue with John Rawls and J?rgen Habermas on one side, and the political tenets of Blair, Clinton and SchrÜder on the other, Mouffe brings to the fore the paradoxical nature of modern liberal democracy in which the category of the 'adversary' plays a central role. She draws on the work of Wittgenstein, Derrida, and the provocative theses of Carl Schmitt, to propose a new understanding of democracy which acknowledges the ineradicability of antagonism in its workings.
 

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Contents

Democracy Power and The Political
17
Carl Schmitt and the Paradox of Liberal Democracy
36
Wittgenstein Political Theory and Democracy
60
For an Agonistic Model of Democracy
80
A Politics Without Adversary?
108
The Ethics of Democracy
129
Index
141
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About the author (2000)

Chantal Mouffe is a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for the Study of Democracy at the University of Westminster. Her books include "The Return of the Political"; "Hegemony and Socialist Strategy" (with Ernesto Laclau); "The Dimensions of Radical Democracy"; "Gramsci and Marxist Theory"; "Deconstruction and Pragmatism"; "The Democratic Paradox"; and "The Challenge of Carl Schmitt," all from Verso.

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