The Digital Humanities: A Primer for Students and Scholars

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 30, 2015 - Computers - 273 pages
The Digital Humanities is a comprehensive introduction and practical guide to how humanists use the digital to conduct research, organize materials, analyze, and publish findings. It summarizes the turn toward the digital that is reinventing every aspect of the humanities among scholars, libraries, publishers, administrators, and the public. Beginning with some definitions and a brief historical survey of the humanities, the book examines how humanists work, what they study, and how humanists and their research have been impacted by the digital and how, in turn, they shape it. It surveys digital humanities tools and their functions, the digital humanists' environments, and the outcomes and reception of their work. The book pays particular attention to both theoretical underpinnings and practical considerations for embarking on digital humanities projects. It places the digital humanities firmly within the historical traditions of the humanities and in the contexts of current academic and scholarly life.
 

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Contents

The Evolving Landscape for the Digital Humanities
166
The HalfLife of Wisdom
178
Notes
219
Glossary
233

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About the author (2015)

Eileen Gardiner is co-founder and co-publisher of Italica Press. She has served as director of ACLS Humanities E-Book, executive director of The Medieval Academy of America, and co-editor of Speculum: A Journal of Medieval Studies. She is author of Visions of Heaven and Hell Before Dante, Medieval Visions of Heaven and Hell, The Pilgrim's Way to St Patrick's Purgatory, and Hell-on-Line, a website on the infernal otherworld in various traditions.

Ronald G. Musto is co-founder and co-publisher of Italica Press. He has served as director of ACLS Humanities E-Book, co-executive director of The Medieval Academy of America, and editor of Speculum: A Journal of Medieval Studies. He has taught at New York University, Duke University, North Carolina and Columbia University, New York, and has held American Academy in Rome, National Endowment for the Humanities and Mellon Foundation fellowships. He has published nine books and various articles, including Apocalypse in Rome and Renaissance Society and Culture (co-edited with John Monfasani).

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