The Disappearance of Objects: New York Art and the Rise of the Postmodern City

Front Cover
Yale University Press, 2009 - Art - 232 pages

In the years around 1960, a rapid process of deindustrialization profoundly changed New York City. At the same time, massive highway construction, urban housing renewal, and the growth of the financial sector altered the city’s landscape. As the new economy took shape, manufacturing lofts, piers, and small shops were replaced by sleek high-rise housing blocks and office towers.

Focusing on works by Claes Oldenburg, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Donald Judd, art historian Joshua Shannon shows how New York art engaged with this transformation of the city. Shannon convincingly argues that these four artists---all living amid the changes---filled their art with old street signs, outmoded flashlights, and other discarded objects in a richly revealing effort to understand the economic and architectural transformation of their city.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

The Disappearance of Objects: New York Art and the Rise of the Postmodern City

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Claes Oldenburg, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Donald Judd-all are iconic names in art history, and each is allowed a chapter's worth of exploration by Shannon (contemporary art history ... Read full review

Contents

A NeoDada City
19
The Disappearance of Objects
59
Black Market
93
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Joshua Shannon is assistant professor of contemporary art history and theory at the University of Maryland.

Bibliographic information