The Dublin Review, Bind 48

Forsideomslag
W. Spooner, 1860
 

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Populære passager

Side 451 - THIS fable my lord devised, to the end that he might exhibit therein a model or description of a college, instituted for the interpreting of nature, and the producing of great and marvellous works, for the benefit of men ; under the name of Solomon's House, or the College of the Six Days
Side 90 - But this I say, brethren, the time is short: it remaineth, that both they that have wives be as though they had none; And they that weep, as though they wept not; and they that rejoice, as though they rejoiced not; and they that buy, as though they possessed not; And they that use this world, as not abusing it: for the fashion of this world passeth away.
Side 121 - Ben Battle was a soldier bold, And used to war's alarms: But a cannon-ball took off his legs, So he laid down his arms! Now, as they bore him off the field, Said he, "Let others shoot, For here I leave my second leg, And the Forty-second Foot...
Side 104 - Strong against tide the enormous whale Emerges as he goes. But stronger still in earth and air, And in the sea the man of prayer, And far beneath the tide: And in the seat to faith assigned, Where ask is have, where seek is find, Where knock is open wide.
Side 92 - Alas ! — how light a cause may move Dissension between hearts that love ! Hearts that the world in vain had tried, And sorrow but more closely tied ; That stood the storm, when waves were rough, Yet in a sunny hour fall off, Like ships that have gone down at sea, When heaven was all tranquillity...
Side 115 - Fonder of purl and skittle-grounds than truth. Silence, ye gods ! to keep your tongues in awe, The muse shall tell an accident she saw. Pat Jennings in the upper gallery sat ; But leaning forward, Jennings lost his hat ; Down from the gallery the beaver flew, And spurned the one, to settle in the two.
Side 413 - We look before and after, And pine for what is not: Our sincerest laughter With some pain is fraught; Our sweetest songs are those that tell of saddest thought.
Side 68 - To my mind it accords better with what we know of the laws impressed on matter by the Creator that the production and extinction of the past and present inhabitants of the world should have been due to secondary causes, like those determining the birth and death of the individual. When I view all beings not as special creations but as the lineal descendants of some few beings which lived long before the first bed of the Silurian system was deposited, they seem to me to become ennobled.
Side 67 - Therefore I should infer from analogy that probably all the organic beings which have ever lived on this earth, have descended from some one primordial form, into which life was first breathed.
Side 122 - I wish I ne'er had seen your face ; But now a long farewell ! For you will be my death ;— alas ! You will not be my Nell!

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