The Dublin University Magazine: A Literary and Political Journal, Volume 26

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W. Curry, jun., and Company, 1845
 

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Page 10 - By necessaries I understand not only the commodities which are indispensably necessary for the support of life, but whatever the custom of the country renders it indecent for creditable people, even of the lowest order, to be without.
Page 1 - The subjects of every state ought to contribute towards the support of the government, as nearly as possible, in proportion to their respective abilities ; that is, in proportion to the revenue which they respectively enjoy under the protection of the state.
Page 1 - The tax which each individual is bound to pay ought to be certain, and not arbitrary. The time of payment, the manner of payment, the quantity to be paid, ought all to be clear and plain to the contributor, and to every other person.
Page 2 - Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take out and to keep out of the pockets of the people as little as possible, over and above what it brings into the public treasury of the state.
Page 189 - To hear him speak, and sweetly smile, You were in Paradise the while. A sweet attractive kind of grace ; A full assurance given by looks ; Continual comfort in a face, The lineaments of Gospel books — I trow that count'nance cannot lye, Whose thoughts are legible in the eye.
Page 1 - Every tax ought to be levied at the time, or in the manner, in which it is most likely to be convenient for the contributor to pay it.
Page 312 - This same Hezekiah also stopped the upper watercourse of Gihon, and brought it straight down to the west side of the city of David.
Page 78 - We know our duty to our sovereign, and are loyal. We know our duty to ourselves, and are resolved to be- free. We seek for our rights, and no more than our rights; and in so just a pursuit, we should doubt the being of a Providence if we doubted of success.
Page 219 - You know I always seek in what I see the manifestation of something beyond the present and tangible object ; and as we do not agree in physiognomy, so we may not agree now.
Page 1 - Where it is otherwise, every person subject to the tax is put more or less in the power of the taxgatherer, who can either aggravate the tax upon any obnoxious contributor, or extort by the terror of such aggravation, some present or perquisite to himself. The uncertainty of taxation encourages the insolence and favours the corruption of an order of men who are naturally unpopular, even when they are neither insolent nor corrupt.

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