The Eagle of the Ninth

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Oxford University Press, 2011 - Juvenile Fiction - 304 pages
Four thousand men disappeared and their eagle standard was lost. It's a mystery that's never been solved, until now . . .Marcus has to find out what happened to his father, who led the legion. So he sets out into the unknown, on a quest so dangerous that nobody expects him to return.The Eagle of the Ninth is heralded as one of the most outstanding children's books of the twentieth century and has sold over a million copies worldwide. Rosemary Sutcliff's books about Roman Britain have won much acclaim. The author writes with such passion and with such attention to detail that the Roman age is instantly brought to life and stays with the reader long after the last page has been turned.
 

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User Review  - foggidawn - www.librarything.com

Young centurion Marcus Flavius Aquila's father disappeared with the doomed Ninth Legion in northern Britain. When Marcus takes a post in Britain, he hopes to hear or discover something of the lost ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - overthemoon - LibraryThing

I was about 12 when we did Roman Britain in history, and I didn't pay it much attention (we had a very boring teacher for Ancient Greece and Rome). Afterwards I never gave much thought to that period ... Read full review

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About the author (2011)

Rosemary Sutcliff was born in Surrey, the daughter of a naval officer. At the age of two she contracted the progressively wasting Still's disease and spent most of her life in a wheelchair. Apart from reading, she made little progress at school and left at fourteen to attend art school,specializing in miniature painting. In the 1940s she exhibited her first miniature in the Royal Academy and was elected a member of the Royal Society of Miniature Painters just after the war. In 1950 her first children's book, The Queen's Story, was published and from then on she devoted her time towriting the children's historical novels which have made her such an esteemed and highly respected name in the field of children's literature. She received an OBE in the 1975 Birthday Honour's List and a CBE in 1992. Rosemary Sutcliff died at the age of 72 in 1992.

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