The Eclogues and Georgics of Virgil,

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1915 - Agriculture - 119 pages
 

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Page 29 - Draw from the city, my songs, draw Daphnis home. Songs have might even to draw down the moon from heaven: with songs Circe transformed the crew of Ulysses: by singing the cold snake is burst asunder in the meadows. Draw from the city, my songs, draw Daphnis home. Threefold first I twine about thee these diverse triplehued threads, and thrice round these altars I draw thine image: an odd number is god's delight. Draw from the city, my songs, draw Daphnis home. Tie the threefold colours in three knots,...
Page 35 - ... our eyes have seen, red with blood-stained elderberries and vermilion. Shall there be a limit? he said: Love recks not aught of this. Neither is cruel Love satiated with tears, nor the grasses with the rills, nor bees with cytisus, nor she-goats with leafage. But sadly he: Yet you will be singing, O Arcadians, to your hills of this: alone Arcadians are skilled to sing. Ah how softly then may my ashes rest, if your pipe once may tell of my loves.
Page 14 - POLLIO MUSES of Sicily, sing we a somewhat ampler strain: not all men's delight is in coppices and lowly tamarisks: if we sing of the woods, let them be woods worthy of a Consul. Now is come the last age of the Cumaean prophecy: the great cycle of periods is born anew. Now returns the Maid, returns the reign of Saturn: now from high heaven a new generation comes down. Yet do thou at that boy's birth, in whom the iron race shall begin to cease, and the golden to arise over all the world, holy Lucina,...
Page 33 - L.—Thy talking prolongs our desire: and now, see, all the mere is smooth and still, and all the windy murmur of the breeze, look, is sunk away. Just from this point is half our road, for Bianor's tomb begins to show: here, where rustics \ strip the thick-leaved sprays., here, Moeris, let us sing; here set down thy kids; for all that, we shall reach the town. Or if we fear lest night ere then gather to rain, we may go singing all the way; so the road wearies the less: that we may go singing, I will...
Page 120 - ON TUSCAN FARMS REVOLVE EACH CHANGELESS YEAR THE WORLD-OLD TOILS OF THE WORLD IN ORDER MEET : LABOUR is GOOD AND REST FROM LABOUR SWEET, KIND LEAFAGE AND MOSSED CAVE AND LIVING MERE : THROUGH SILVER OLIVE-ORCHARDS PLOUGHS THE STEER, AND SHEPHERDS SING IN SHADED SUMMER HEAT; BUT WHO HAS EYES TO TRACK THE WOOD-GOD'S FEET, THE WINE-GOD'S WORLD-SONG WHO HAS EARS TO HEAR? VIRGIL, OUR BRAINSICK LIFE...
Page 3 - ECLOGUE I.— TITYRUS MELIBOEUS TITYRUS M. — Tityrus, thou where thou liest under the covert of spreading beech, broodest on thy slim pipe over the Muse of the woodland : we leave our native borders and pleasant fields ; we fly our native land, while thou, Tityrus, at ease in the shade teachest the woods to echo fair Amaryllis. T.
Page 47 - The later advent of the autumn rains in Greece postponed the date of ploughing and sowing to October, and in Phoenicia and Palestine to November, when the first showers softened the soil preliminary to the heavy rains which began a month later. At the first sign of rain it was customary to "begin...
Page 14 - Us it skills not to determine this strife between you: both thou and he are worthy of the heifer, and whosoever shrinks not from Love's sweetness shall not taste his bitterness. Shut off the rivulets now, my children: the meadows have drunk their fill. ECLOGUE...
Page 26 - ... descend in glad and abundant showers. Co. — Alcides takes most delight in the poplar, lacchus in the vine, fair Venus in the myrtle, Phoebus in his own bay-tree : Phyllis loves hazels : while Phyllis loves them neither shall myrtle excel the hazels, nor Phoebus' bay. Th. — The ash is most beautiful in the forest, the pine in the garden, the poplar by the river, the fir on the mountain heights : but if thou come back yet again to me, O fair Lycidas, the forest ash, the garden pine shall yield...

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