The Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, Volume 38

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A. and C. Black, 1845 - Science
 

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Page 249 - He causeth the vapours to ascend from the ends of the earth ; he maketh lightnings for the rain ; he bringeth the wind out of his treasuries.
Page 265 - He paweth in the valley and rejoiceth in his strength; He goeth on to meet the armed men. He mocketh at fear and is not affrighted; Neither turneth he back from the sword. The quiver rattleth against him, The glittering spear and the shield. He swalloweth the ground with fierceness and rage; Neither believeth he that it is the sound of the trumpet. He saith among the trumpets, "Ha, Ha!" And he smelleth the battle afar off, The thunder of the captains, and the shouting.
Page 241 - By the word of the Lord were the heavens made; and all the host of them by the breath of his mouth. He gathereth the waters of the sea together as an heap ; he layeth up the depth in storehouses.
Page 253 - Hitherto shalt thou come, and no further, and here shall thy proud waves be stayed," these irregular and prodigious vagaries seem to bespeak a decay, and forebode, perhaps, not a very distant dissolution.
Page 260 - all human discoveries seem to be made only for the purpose of confirming more and more strongly the truths contained in the holy Scriptures.
Page 379 - Commissioners themselves state) increase in a ratio which " somewhat exceeds the ratio of the difference between the temperature of the air and that of the surrounding surface with which it is in contact.
Page 275 - In these different places the ground is frequently agitated by the most violent shocks ; but sometimes, in the same rock, the superior strata form invincible obstacles to the propagation of the motion. Thus, in the mines of Saxony, we have seen workmen hasten up alarmed by oscillations which were not felt at the surface of the ground.
Page 143 - Indians of the tropical plains ; and these again resemble the tribes which inhabit the region west of the Rocky Mountains, those of the great valley of the Mississippi, and those again which skirt the Esquimaux on the north.
Page 173 - ... the American race is essentially separate and peculiar, whether we regard it in its physical, its moral, or its intellectual relations. To us there are no direct or obvious links between the people of the old world and the new...
Page 244 - They go up by the mountains; they go down by the valleys unto the place which thou hast founded for them. Thou hast set a bound that they may not pass over; that they turn not again to cover the earth.

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