The Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal: Exhibiting a View of the Progressive Discoveries and Improvements in the Sciences and the Arts, Volume 39

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A. and C. Black, 1845 - Science
 

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Page 392 - Fe. Very great numbers of birds, wild animals, cattle, and horses perished from the want of food and water. A man told me that the deer used to come into his courtyard to the well which he had been obliged to dig to supply his own family with water, and that the partridges had hardly strength to fly away when pursued.
Page 393 - Subsequently to the drought of 1827 to 1832, a very rainy season followed, which caused great floods. Hence it is almost certain that some thousands of the skeletons were buried by the deposits of the very next year. What would be the opinion of a geologist viewing such an enormous collection of bones, of all kinds of animals and of all ages, thus embedded in one thick earthy mass? Would he not attribute it to a flood having swept V over the surface of the land, rather than to the common order of...
Page 393 - I was informed by an eye-witness that the cattle in herds of thousands rushed into the Parana, and being exhausted by hunger they were unable to crawl up the muddy banks, and thus were drowned. The arm of the river which runs by San Pedro was so full of putrid carcasses, that the master of a vessel told me that the smell rendered it quite impassable. Without doubt several hundred thousand animals thus perished in the river: their bodies when putrid were seen floating down the stream; and many in...
Page 92 - ... we find at New York, the summer of Rome, and the winter of Copenhagen ; at Quebec, the summer of Paris, and the winter of St Petersburgh. At Pekin, also, where the mean temperature of the year is that of the coasts of Brittany, the scorching heats of summer are greater than at Cairo, and the winters are as rigorous as at Upsal.
Page 391 - One of the men had already found thirteen deer (Cerna campestris) lying dead, and I saw their fresh hides. Another of the party, a few minutes after my arrival, brought in seven more. Now, I well know that one man without dogs could hardly have killed seven deer in a week. The men believed they had seen about fifteen dead ostriches (part of one...
Page 184 - ... the bottom of the ocean, as well as on high mountains, at the elevation of about nine thousand feet, (Niglherri, Mexico,) and even in the smallest particles of humus, microscopic life has not merely an existence, but is in exuberant abundance. " 3. The European microscopic organisms have been shewn to be so related to those of other parts of the earth, that new orders, classes, and families, are nowhere found ; but the forms all belong to the generally siliceous, never calcareous shelled Polygastric...
Page 76 - On approaching our southern coast, climate undergoes a most remarkable modification. The seasons glide imperceptibly into each other, exhibiting no great extremes. This is strikingly illustrated on comparing the difference between the mean temperature of summer and winter at Fort Snelling, Iowa, and at Key West, at the southern point of Florida the former being 56.60, and the latter only 11.34.
Page 229 - Humboldt — his work on the Climate of the United States and its endemic influences.
Page 202 - ... former, (that is, to the pressure of a column of 1'2 inch of mercury), the thermometer indicated a temperature of 166 below zero of Fahrenheit's scale. In this state, the ether was very fluid ; and the bath could be kept in good order for a quarter of an hour at a time. The author found that there were many gases which, on being subjected to cold of this extreme intensity, condensed into liquids, even without a greater condensation than that arising from the ordinary atmospheric pressure, and...
Page 264 - ... and altered throughout their physical and chemical characters. If it be true that the crystals of serpentine are pseudomorphous crystals, altered from chrysolite, it is...

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