The Edinburgh tales, conducted by mrs. Johnstone, Volume 1

Front Cover
Christian Isobel Johnstone
1845
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 308 - There be three things which are too wonderful for me, yea, four which I know not: The way of an eagle in the air; the way of a serpent upon a rock; the way of a ship in the midst of the sea; and the way of a man with a maid.
Page 223 - A being breathing thoughtful breath, A traveller betwixt life and death. The reason firm, the temperate will, Endurance, foresight, strength, and skill, A perfect woman, nobly planned, To warn, to comfort, and command ; And yet a spirit still, and bright With something of an angel light.
Page 374 - Eye hath not seen, nor Ear heard, neither hath it entered into the Heart of Man, to conceive the things which God hath prepared for them that love him.
Page 259 - ... apple-tree, with its red bursting buds ! It looks so stately and broad ; and every one, that passes under it, thinks surely something great will come of it; then the sun grows hot, and the buds come joyfully forth; but the wicked kernel is already there, which pushes off and casts away the fair flower's dress ; and now, in pain and waxing, it can do nothing more, but must grow to fruit in harvest. An apple, to be sure, is pretty and refreshing ; yet nothing to the blossom of spring. So is it...
Page 261 - Then came, in waving brightness, a stately freight; it seemed an old man mounted on a small white horse, and all were crowding round him. I saw nothing of the horse but its head ; for the rest of it was covered with costly glittering cloths and trappings : on his brow the old man had a crown, so bright, that as he came across I thought the sun was rising there, and the redness of the dawn glimmering in my eyes. Thus it went on all night ; I at last fell asleep in the tumult, half in joy, half in...
Page 252 - The mother went in, and soon came out again with her husband. They locked the door, and turned towards the fields to look after their labourers, and see their hay-harvest in the meadow. Their house lay upon a little green height, encircled by a pretty ring of paling, which likewise enclosed their fruit and flower garden. The hamlet stretched somewhat deeper down, and on the other side lay the castle of the Count: Martin rented the large farm from this nobleman ; and was living in contentment with...
Page 255 - Behind them sat an old crumpled little man, whom Zerina reverently greeted ; he thanked her with a grave inclination of his head. He held a sceptre in his hand, and wore a crown upon his brow, and all the other dwarfs appeared to regard him as their master, and obey his nod. " What more wanted ?" asked he, with a surly voice, as the children came a little nearer. Mary was afraid, and did not speak ; but her companion answered, they were only come to look about them in the chambers. " Still your old...
Page 259 - The little thing was greatly frightened ; and at last confessed that she had found it in the garden, and as she liked it much, had kept it carefully : she at the same time prayed so earnestly and pressingly to...
Page 203 - What man dare, I dare: Approach thou like the rugged Russian bear, The arm'd rhinoceros, or the Hyrcan tiger; Take any shape but that, and my firm nerves Shall never tremble...
Page 255 - Still your old child's tricks!" replied the dwarf; "will there never be an end to idleness?' With this, he turned again to his employment, kept his people weighing and sorting the ingots ; some he sent away on errands, some he chid with angry tones. " Who is the gentleman !" said Mary. " Our Metal-Prince," replied Zerina, as they walked along. They seemed once more to reach the open air, for they were standing by a lake, yet no sun appeared, and they saw no sky above their • heads. A little boat...

Bibliographic information