The Elemental Changes: The Ancient Chinese Companion to the I Ching

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SUNY Press, Jan 27, 1994 - History - 391 pages
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Composed in 2 B.C., as "The I Ching revised and enlarged," The Elemental Changes is a divination manual providing a clear method for distinguishing alternative courses of action. Structured in 81 tetragrams ( as opposed to the 64 hexagrams of the I Ching), the book offers much to the modern reader. Today in the West, The Elemental Changes is an essential tool for understanding the Tao as it operates in the Cosmos, in the minds of sages, and in sacred texts. It is also one of the great philosophical poems in world literature, assessing the rival claims on human attention of fame, physical immortality, wealth, and power while it situates human endeavor within the larger framework of cosmic energies.

The complete text of The Elemental Changes and its ten autocommentaries are here translated into accessible and, whenever possible, literal English. Following the Chinese tradition, supplementary comments are appended to each tetragram in order to indicate the main lines of interpretation suggested by earlier commentators.
 

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Contents

I
1
II
19
III
25
IV
29
V
35
VI
39
VII
43
VIII
47
XLIX
207
L
211
LI
216
LII
221
LIII
224
LIV
229
LV
233
LVI
238

IX
50
X
56
XI
60
XII
63
XIII
67
XIV
70
XV
74
XVI
78
XVII
82
XVIII
85
XIX
89
XX
95
XXI
98
XXII
101
XXIII
106
XXIV
109
XXV
112
XXVI
116
XXVII
119
XXVIII
123
XXIX
128
XXX
131
XXXI
135
XXXII
140
XXXIII
144
XXXIV
148
XXXV
152
XXXVI
155
XXXVII
160
XXXVIII
163
XXXIX
167
XL
171
XLI
174
XLII
177
XLIII
181
XLIV
185
XLV
191
XLVI
195
XLVII
198
XLVIII
203
LVII
242
LVIII
246
LIX
250
LX
253
LXI
257
LXII
261
LXIII
265
LXIV
269
LXV
273
LXVI
276
LXVII
279
LXVIII
282
LXIX
286
LXX
289
LXXI
292
LXXII
295
LXXIII
299
LXXIV
302
LXXV
306
LXXVI
309
LXXVII
312
LXXVIII
315
LXXIX
317
LXXX
320
LXXXI
323
LXXXII
326
LXXXIII
329
LXXXIV
332
LXXXV
337
LXXXVI
340
LXXXVII
342
LXXXVIII
347
LXXXIX
351
XC
362
XCI
366
XCII
369
XCIII
373
XCIV
377
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About the author (1994)

Michael Nylan is professor, Department of History, University of California Berkeley

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