The Elements of Morality: Including Polity

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Deighton, Bell & Company, 1864 - Ethics - 611 pages
 

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Contents

CHAPTER II
28
Natural Wants 50 The Need of a Mutual Under 27 Artificial Wants standing 2 The Affections 51 A mutual Understanding is ne 28 Tend to Persons c...
29
Kinds of Love 53 Desire of Equal Rules
30
Anger 54 The Desire of Knowledge
31
Gratitude Resentment Malice 55 Knowledge and Reason
32
Man in Society 4 The Moral Sentiments
33
Intercourse of Men 56 Approbation and Disapprobation
34
Tend to Abstractions 5 The Reflex Sentiments
35
Memory and Imagination 57 Reflex Thought
36
Good Hope and Fear 68 The Desire of being loved
37
Separation of Mental Desires In 59 The Desire of Esteem stincts 60 The Desire of our own Appro
38
The Desire of Safety
39
Instinct of Selfpreservation
40
Desire of Security
41
General Remarks 42 Desire of Liberty 61 Springs of Action operate through
42
Men at Enmity the Will
43
The Desire of Having 62 Are modified by Thought
44
Things and Persons 63 Our reason is Ourselves 46 Propertyis necessary 64 Passion 47 The Desire of Family Society 65 The Soul CHAPTER III
45
CHAPTER IV
47
75
49
THe RigHts of Mabiuage
52
CHAPTER V
58
BOOK II
65
CHAPTER II
70
Right relatively used 73 Right absolutely used
71
Refers to a superior End 74 The Supreme Good
72
Origin of the Five Virtues Correspondence of the Five Vir tues and of the Five Rights
75
The Five Virtues and Goodness Objective and Subjective Jus tice
76
Karnes of Objective and Subjective Virtues The Five Cardinal Virtues Love of Good Vice
77
CHAPTER III
78
Kinds of Love The Heart 132 Regard Gratitude
79
Sympathy Compassion
83
Covetousness Frugality
85
Temperance Chastity
87
Reflex Virtues and Vices
89
Vanity Honour
92
CHAPTER IV
94
The Principles express of Hu manity Justice Truth Purity Order 163 The Principle of Earnestness 164 The Principle of Moral Ends 165 Operative Pri...
96
Duties
97
CHAPTER VI
100
The Objection
111
CHAPTER X
124
CHAPTER XI
130
CHAPTER XII
135
CHAPTER XIII
142
615
145
Answer
163
Virtue depends on Duty
166
Duty involves conscious Thought
167
Duty becomes Virtue by repe tition
168
Special benevolent Affections 183 Duty of Universal Benevolence
174
Fraternal Affection is a Duty 191 Duty to love Enemies
180
CHAPTER VII
188
350
193
Of the Mobal Culture of the Affections as a Duty
195
Objection from Rights and
196
CHAPTER XIX
199
We have never done all that is 208 The Duty of Moral Culture adds
201
371
205
CHAPTER VIII
209
Answer
215
CHAPTER XXIII
224
Greece and Rome
225
CHAPTER XXIV
230
CHAPTER XXV
237
Duties of Prudence and Wisdom Rule
238
The Representative System of Government
244
BOOK III
251
Transgression gress
252
Temptation 258 Repentance
253
Resistance 259 Amendment
254
Degrees of Guilt 260 Not necessarily sufficient
255
Measure of Guilt 261 Amendment must be immediate
256
Is to act according to Conscience 275 A good man is conscientious always right? 276 Doubtful Conscience Good Con
268
Conscience is to be enlightened science
269
CHAPTER XV
271
Weight of tho Clergy
275
Cases of Conscience respecting Teitth 153
277
Casuistry often suspected 293 Promise to Robbers
278
A Case of Conscience means 294 Should the Promise be given? What ought I to do 1 295 Analogy of the
279
Interpretation of Promises 296 Lies
280
Erroneous Promises 297 Falsehoods under Convention
281
Promises released by the Pro 298 To be carefully limited misee 299 Lie to conceal a Secret
282
Unlawful Promises 300 Lie to preserve a Mans Life
283
but the Rela 301 Lies of Necessity tive Duty is violated 302 Heroic Lies
284
Promises which become un 303 Advocates Assertions lawful 304 Advocates Profession to
285
Which Promisee does not think Moral unlawful 305 Sellers Concealments
286
Electors Promise 306 The Alexandrian Merchant
287
Promise to a Representative 307 Promise of Marriage
288
Promise to be kept after the 308 The unlawful Promise of Mar immoral action riage
289
Contradictory Promisea 309 Implied Promise of Marriage
290
Impossible Promises
291
CHristian Precepts concerning Property and otHer Objects
294
CHAPTER XIII
309
CHAPTER XIV
317
625
324
CHAPTER XV
330
BOOK
337
Five Classes of Primary Rights
344
Wrongs against the Person
345
K59 Excusable Homicide
351
Dissent
354
Moveable Property
359
Contracts to be enforced 711
367
895
369
The State is one and perpetual
374
CHAPTER XXI
387
Is universal though not uniform
393
3S9 Justice rejects what is arbitrary
399
CHAPTER II
408
The Obligation of upholding 799 Has the State a Right to repress
415
CHAPTER V
427
Pleasure c are various views 441 Definition of Pleasure
440
Both maxims of Justice acknow
444
Obedience to Parents
445
896
456
911
464
902
468
To mark the condemnation
469
Duties of the StateJustice and Truth
479
Inconvenience of the language
480
CHAPTER XIII
494
Revolution does not admit
496
Willingness to Give
508
The two grounds are consistent
512
CHAPTER VI
518
Founded on historical reasons
523
Law must conform to this course
525
1039
529
Piety of Children
537
1058
542
War not necessarily unjust
545
CHAPTER IX
546
1062
548
Moral Rules are not the main
552
Local Allegiance
563
Natural Piett
564
The Reason Speculative
579
Founding Morality upon
583
The Will of God is the source
586
Objection
590
Of Paleys Moral Philosophy
599
CHAPTER X
602
Op Mitigations op the Laws op War
605
Answer
609
Meaning of an Oath to
610

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Page 262 - Beloved, let us love one another: for love is of God; and every one that loveth is born of God, and knoweth God. He that loveth not knoweth not God; for God is love.
Page 442 - Is not the whole land before thee? separate thyself, I pray thee, from me : if thou wilt take the left hand, then I will go to the right ; or if thou depart to the right hand, then I will go to the left.
Page 260 - Ye have heard that it hath been said, Thou shalt love thy neighbour, and hate thine enemy: but I say unto you, Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you, and persecute you...
Page 293 - That they should seek the Lord, if haply they might feel after him, and find him, though he be not far from every one of us: For in him we live, and move, and have our being; as certain also of your own poets have said, For we are also his offspring.
Page 280 - One that ruleth well his own house, having his children in subjection with all gravity; (For if a man know not how to rule his own house, how shall he take care of the church of God?) Not a novice, lest being lifted up with pride he fall into the condemnation of the devil.
Page 520 - Ye know that the princes of the Gentiles exercise dominion over them, and they that are great exercise authority upon them. But it shall not be so among you : but whosoever will be great among you, let him be your minister; and whosoever will be chief among -you, let him be your servant : even as the Son of man came not to be ministered unto, but to minister, and to give his life a ransom for many.
Page 272 - MASTERS, give unto your servants that which is just and equal ; knowing that ye also have a Master in heaven.
Page 258 - Thou shalt not covet'; and if there be any other commandment, it is briefly comprehended in this saying, namely, 'Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.' '"Love worketh no ill to his neighbour: therefore love is the fulfilling of the law.
Page 268 - For God is not unrighteous to forget your work and labour of love, which ye have shewed toward his name, in that ye have ministered to the saints, and do minister.
Page 303 - These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.

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