The Eminent Domain Revolt: Changing Perceptions in a New Constitutional Epoch

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Algora Publishing, 2007 - Law - 269 pages
Ryskamp provides an up-to-the-minute report on the law and politics of eminent domain after the Supreme Court's (in)famous Kelo v. New London decision of June of 2005. All the states are just beginning to debate reforming their eminent domain laws, and there is nothing whatsoever on the market which would give them a clue as to how to frame the debate. Legislators are bewildered as to how to proceed. In the famous Lindsey v. Normet Supreme Court case, 405 U.S. 56 (1972), the Court found there was no right to housing, which is one of the reasons we are in the midst of this eminent domain controversy now. However, the Court made it clear that it was simply the argument which was not convincing, not that such a right could not be found. This book presents, among other things, a new housing right argument which has not previously been used. However, the dominant theme of the book is precisely the unsettled nature of the law and facts of this controversy. Readers need to inform themselves and think for themselves. In an area in which public opinion will determine much of the outcome, there are no experts — and public opinion is just beginning to form. This book is for everyone — from lawyers to planners to legislators to the lay public — who is interested in the eminent domain issue as it plays out in state legislatures, debates and crises around the country. This issue is in newspapers on a daily or weekly basis now. The system simply cannot resolve it. Legal scholars may disagree about Ryskamp's location of the right to housing (under Fifth Amendment Due Process), but the book will convince many readers that we have to start working to understand the legal principles involved in this controversy.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 Individual Rights Before Kelo v New London
11
Chapter 2 Kelo and Its Discontents
65
Chapter 3 The New Bill of Rights as Law
123
Chapter 4 The New Bill of Rights as Fact
167
Chapter 5 The Early Days of the New Bill of Rights
201
Conclusion
251
Bibliography
261
Index
265
Copyright

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Page 25 - Constitution, independent tribunals of justice will consider themselves in a peculiar manner the guardians of those rights; they will be an impenetrable bulwark against every assumption of power in the Legislative or Executive; they will be naturally led to resist every encroachment upon rights expressly stipulated for in the Constitution by the declaration of rights.
Page 23 - The General Assembly shall provide for the maintenance and support of a thorough and efficient system of public schools, wherein all the children of this Commonwealth, above the age of six years, may be educated, and shall appropriate at least one million dollars each year for that purpose.
Page 13 - The right to earn enough to provide adequate food and clothing and recreation; The right of every farmer to raise and sell his products at a return which will give him and his family a decent living...
Page 23 - A general diffusion of knowledge being essential to the preservation of the liberties and rights of the people, it shall be the duty of the legislature of the state to establish and make suitable provision for the support and maintenance of an efficient system of public free schools.

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