The Empirical and the Transcendental: A Fusion of Horizons

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2000 - Philosophy - 284 pages
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This volume is a collection of critical studies of Professor J. N. Mohanty's work on phenomenology and Indian philosophy. The essays were written especially for this collection by philosophers from India, Europe, the United States, and Australia. The concluding chapter of this volume contains his assessment of his own philosophical position and his response to his critics. The diversity of the topics on which Mohanty has written attests to the multidimensional character and fecundity of his work. The writings in this new collection make the multifaceted character of Mohanty's writings obvious and facilitate the sort of 'comparative philosophy' which Mohanty himself has pursued so vigorously.
 

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Contents

Some Difficulties for Husserlian Phenomenology
37
Essentialism Phenomenology and Historical Cognition
47
The Similarities and Differences between Descriptive and Interpretative Methods in Scientific Phenomenological Psychology
59
Hands
75
Logic and Quantum Physics Some Simple Reflections
89
Empirical and Transcendental Subjectivity An Enigmatic Relation?
101
Toward Transcendental Relativism Reading Buddhist NonDualism as Phenomenology1
117
Heidegger and Transcendental Philosophy
137
Utter Unreflectiveness
179
Is Understanding Teachable?
185
J N Mohantys Critique of Word as a Means of Knowing and Authorless Tradition
197
Nyaya Realism Buddhist Critique
217
The Advance of Indian Philosophy in the Works of J N Mohanty
233
Rationality and Traditions
239
My Philosophical Position TodayResponse to My Critics
251
About the Contributors
279

Transcendental Transitions
153
How is Transcendental Philosophy of Mind and WorldPossible?
167

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Page 24 - But though all our knowledge begins with experience, it does not follow that it all arises out of experience. For it may well be that even our empirical knowledge is made up of what we receive through impressions and of what our own faculty of knowledge (sensible impressions serving merely as the occasion) supplies from itself.

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About the author (2000)

Bina Gupta is professor of philosophy and director of the South Asia Language and Area Center at the University of Missouri at Columbia.

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