The Enemy: An Intellectual Portrait of Carl Schmitt

Front Cover
The writings of Carl Schmitt form what is arguably the most disconcerting, original, and yet still unfamiliar body of twentieth-century political thought. In the English-speaking world, he is terra incognita, a name associated with Nazism, the author of a largely untranslated oeuvre forming no recognizable system, coming to us from a disturbing place and time in the form of fragments.

The Enemy is a comprehensive reconstruction and analysis of all of Schmitt's major works--his books, articles and pamphlets from 1919 to 1950--presented in an arresting narrative form. The revelation of his work is that, unlike mainstream Nazi ideology, Schmitt makes a strong philosophical claim for the necessity of confrontational politics within a democratic system; a claim that has resonance in today's hegemony of consensual politics.
 

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Contents

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS VH Introduction
1
The Young Carl Schmitt
11
Dictatorship Sovereign and Commissarial
28
The State of Emergency
42
Catholicism and Nationalism in Modern Politics
53
The Legitimation Crisis of Parliament
66
Status Quo and Peace
77
Rechtsstaat and Democracy
87
Legality and Legitimacy
155
Trial and Endgame
164
The National Socialist Revolution
176
The Revolution in Legal Thought
190
Flight Forward and Retreat
201
The Leviathan Myth
209
Diaspora Utopia Katechon
221
The International Order and World War
226

The Crisis of Political Reason
101
Between Pluralism and Fascism
116
Presidential Rule and Judicial Activism
138
The Law of the Earth
246
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About the author (2000)

Gopal Balakrishnan is the author of The Enemy: An Intellectual Portrait of Carl Schmitt, and editor of Debating "Empire" and (with Benedict Anderson) Mapping the Nation. A member of the New Left Review editorial board, he teaches Contemporary Theory at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

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