The Estrogen-Depression Connection: The Hidden Link Between Hormones and Women's Depression

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New Harbinger Publications, May 1, 2007 - Self-Help - 208 pages
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What You Need to Know About Hormones and Depression

Research has shown a strong connection between estrogen levels and depression throughout a woman's lifetime. We now understand that abrupt hormonal changes can take a toll on women's moods and even cause serious depression. But the good news is that there is a lot women can do to moderate the effect of these changes.

The Estrogen-Depression Connection explores this issue and offers practical advice and tips for managing mood changes throughout all the major stages of a woman's life-from puberty and menstruation to pregnancy and postpartum, and from perimenopause to menopause. It explains in easy-to-understand terms what women can do right now to help balance these estrogen fluctuations through diet and lifestyle changes, alternative therapies, and medication.

Get the information you need:•Learn how estrogen affects each stage of a woman's life•Cope with postpartum depression and menopause•Find the best medical and alternative treatments

 

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Contents

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About the author (2007)

Karen J. Miller, PhD, is a clinical neuropsychologist at the University of California, Los Angeles, Medical Center. Her clinical and research career has focused on the effects of hormones on cognition and mood, early detection of Alzheimer's Disease, and memory enhancement for age-related memory decline. She is also director of the Neuropsychology Externship Training Program at UCLA, where she trains graduate students in cognitive assessment. She is the author of numerous abstracts and scientific journal authors, presents at national and international conferences, and conducts continuing education seminars for professionals.

Steven A. Rogers, PhD, is assistant professor of clinical psychology at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, CA. His clinical and research career has focused on the neuropsychology of dementia and disorders of aging, the effects of hormones on mood, and the early detection of Alzheimer's disease. He is the author of numerous abstracts and scientific journal authors, presents at national and international conferences, and also provides psychotherapy in private practice.

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