The Evolution of Racism: Human Differences and the Use and Abuse of Science

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Harvard University Press, 2002 - Social Science - 318 pages
Ever since Charles Darwin first wrote about the 'descent of man,' the differences between the human races have been the subject of the most enduring controversy over the 'origin of the species.' Evolutionary theory has been used and abused as a scientific justification or intellectual weapon by racists and anti-racists alike. Careers have been made and broken, lives dedicated or sacrificed, societies destroyed, and wars fought over what Darwin called the 'value of the differences' among humankind. 'The Evolution of Racism' is a history of both evolutionary theory and ideas about race and racism. In an intellectually engaging narrative that mixes science and history, theories and personalities, Pat Shipman explains the original controversy over evolution in Darwin's time; the corruption of evolutionary theory into eugenics; the conflict between laboratory research in genetics and field work in physical anthropology and biology, which gave rise to the "new synthesis" of modern evolutionary biology, which in turn cast new light on the age-old debate over nature verses nurture; and the continuing controversies over the heritability of intelligence, criminal behavior, and other traits. 'The Evolution of Racism' gives a fresh picture of familiar characters such as Darwin, Thomas Huxley, and Ashley Montagu, and introduces general readers to less well known but influential figures such as Ernst Haeckel, the scientific father of the eugenics movement, and Carleton Coon, the last of the great anthropologist/explorers, whose life-long work on racial differences became the center of a bitter academic feud that spilled over into public life. A sober and sobering examination of the most volatile questions about human differences, The Evolution of Racism is a scientific and intellectual history that will open the topic for much-needed discussion and open our minds along the way.
 

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THE EVOLUTION OF RACISM: Human Differences and the Use and Abuse of Science

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A thoughtful and provocative look at scientific racism from the rise of the theory of evolution to the present. Paleoanthropologist Shipman (coauthor, The Neanderthals: Changing the Image of Mankind ... Read full review

The evolution of racism: human differences and the use and abuse of science

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Shipman, coauthor of The Neandertals (LJ 12/92), is quickly becoming one of the better popular science writers working today. Here she traces the intertwined history of evolution and racism from the ... Read full review

Contents

PROLOGUE
13
A Man Who Has Lost Himself
37
CHAPTERS The Question of Questions for Mankind
53
EVOLUTION EVOLVING
71
Freedom in Science
85
EVOLUTIONARY RACISM
105
Sweeping Toward a Racial Abyss
122
THE GENETICS OF EVOLUTION
143
EVOLUTIONARY POLITICS
171
As Brainwashed as Pavlovs Puppies
192
THE GENETICS OF RACISM
223
A Conflict Character
240
Valuing the Differences
263
BIBLIOGRAPHY
293
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About the author (2002)

Pat Shipman is Professor of Anthropology at Pennsylvania State University. She is a Fellow of the Royal Geographic Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She has won numerous awards and honors for her writing, including the 1997 Rhà ́ne-Poulenc Prize for The Wisdom of the Bones (coauthored with Alan Walker) and the Phi Beta Kappa Prize for Science for Taking Wing, which was also a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Award and a New York Times Notable Book of the Year in 1998.

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