The Expansion of England

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National geographic society, 1900 - Great Britain - 263 pages
 

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Page 249 - ... Surrounding the central figure of Sir Walter Raleigh should be Drake, Hawkins, Frobisher, Davis, Captain John Smith, Bartholomew Gosnold, zealous Richard Hakluyt, and the others. In that notable time there is no figure so romantic as Raleigh's. There was no other mind so generous and so capable, none of so great comprehension and scope as his, concerning the opening of this New World. He it was who, in the pressure and the dangers of that time, most clearly discerned that it was from America...
Page 249 - ... good M. Hakluyt and MH I have joyned you both in one letter of remembrance, as two that I love dearely well, and commending me most heartily to you both, I commit you to the tuition of the Almightie. From the new Fort in Virginia, this third of September, 1585. Your most assured friend RALPH LANE. " The name and fame of Sir Walter Raleigh are perpetuated in the name of the capital of one of our States, — a State which I wish bore the name of Roanoke instead of North Carolina, that a double...
Page 249 - ... assured friend RALPH LANE. " The name and fame of Sir Walter Raleigh are perpetuated in the name of the capital of one of our States, — a State which I wish bore the name of Roanoke instead of North Carolina, that a double historical lesson might be taught. I wish that there might stand in the centre of the city of Raleigh, which perpetuates this historic name, a worthy monument to the great movement for the English colonization of America. The central figure of that monument should be Sir...
Page 250 - ... no other mind so generous and so capable, none of so great comprehension and scope as his, concerning the opening of this New World. He it was who, in the pressure and the dangers of that time, most clearly discerned that it was from America that Spain derived so much of her wealth and power. He was inspired by the desire that England should have a foothold here, and that she should supplant Spain in the New World ; and at last, after the failure of all the colonies which he sent out, one following...
Page 249 - Melanchthon, the Elector, and the various men who, in the political and intellectual advances of the time and the preceding time, were co-operators with him in that many-sided movement which we call the Reformation. I wish that the movement for the colonization of the New World by our English race, one of the most momentous chapters in history, might have a similar commemoration. Surrounding the central figure of Sir Walter Raleigh should be Drake, Hawkins, Frobisher, Davis, Captain John Smith, Bartholomew...
Page 249 - Walter Raleigh. At Worms, on the banks of the Rhine, where Luther made his memorable protest against the Empire and the Church, is that noblest and most impressive of all monuments, in which the figure of the great reformer is surrounded by the forms of Wyclif, Savonarola, Huss, Melanchthon, the Elector, and the various men who, in the political and intellectual advances of the time and the preceding time, were co-operators with him in that many-sided movement which we call the Reformation. I wish...
Page 269 - The Island of Titicaca is now the property of Mr. Miguel Garces, of Puno. A village of 700 or 800 Indians are living in mud huts and raising wheat, barley and potatoes among the remnants of the earliest culture of America. The island lies a mile or so from the main shore, from which it is separated by a bottomless channel. The nearest port is the little town of Calle. There is no communication except by balsas...
Page 249 - ... instead of North Carolina, that a double historical lesson might be taught. I wish that there might stand in the centre of the city of Raleigh, which perpetuates this historic name, a worthy monument to the great movement for the English colonization of America. The central figure of that monument should be Sir Walter Raleigh. At Worms, on the banks of the Rhine, where Luther made his memorable protest against the Empire and the Church, is that noblest and most impressive of all monuments, in...
Page 271 - ... accuracy, he carries a bag full of small stones, and shies them with an aim that David himself could not have excelled. Indeed, he can touch the tip of the ear of the leader of his eight-mule team nine times out of ten with a pebble not larger than a pigeon's egg. The road is covered with boulders that vary in size from a baseball to a washtub, round and smooth, and they are strewn from one end of the journey to the other. It seems as if all the boulders in the world had been collected and dropped...
Page 275 - The short skirts of gay colors hang above the shoe tops, and reveal gay hosiery and native shoes of brightcolored leather, with long laces and high French heels. Sometimes the shoes are white, sometimes yellow, red, or purple — the brighter the better — and any color except black. Under the skirt are an indefinite number of white petticoats, elaborately embroidered and edged with lace. The waists are made of bright-colored calico, velveteen, and other fabrics, and around their shoulders they...

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