The Expansion of Russia: Problems of the East and Problems of the Far East

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International monthly, 1900 - Eastern question - 95 pages
 

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Page 67 - On his part, Governor Muravief endeavored to persuade the local mandarins that the best thing to do was to leave the Russians alone. The Chinese demanded that negotiations be entered upon with their Emperor; Muravief thought that Pekin was too far away for that and that Chinese diplomacy was too slow. He continued to act, therefore, as if the country were already a Russian province, and strengthened his position by building along the river the forts Alexandrovsk, Mikhailovsk, and Nicolaievsk, —...
Page 39 - The opinions of Prince Oukhtomski seem to reveal a new element in Russian policy. Formerly the Russians were indignant over Prince Bismarck's reported observation that "Russia has nothing to do in the West. Her mission is in Asia; there she represents civilization.
Page 63 - Church a saint, of the old outlaw. Along the pathways that he had marked out, there soon followed a stream of "good fellows" of every description, goldseekers, fur-hunters, and peasants fleeing the estates of their feudal lords in search of government lands that they might cultivate as freemen. Hither also flocked religious dissenters, persecuted by the Orthodox Church, who found a shelter in the immensity of the Siberian forest, retreats concealed from all mankind. Into this same wilderness escaped...
Page 52 - ... subdue the nomadic Turcomans (Tekke-Turcomans). This was the object of the brilliant campaigns directed by Skobelef, who carried by assault the fortress of Geok-Tepe on January 24, 1 88 1, with a loss to the enemy of eight thousand men. Then he took Askhabad, which was afterwards ceded by Persia.1 The agreement with Persia and the conquest of Turkestan brought Russia's power to the frontier of Afghanistan, which the English regard as the protecting wall of their Indian Empire. At every forward...
Page 46 - Sea, a region that is bounded on the west by the Caspian Sea, on the south by Persia and Afghanistan, on the east by the Chinese Empire, and on the north by Siberia.
Page 76 - It gave the Eastern Chinese Railroad Company the right to build a road through Chinese Manchuria, making it a branch line of the Russian Trans-Siberian Railroad; to develop coal and other mines in the territory traversed by the road, and to devote itself to all other industrial and commercial enterprises. The stock of the company can be held by Chinese and Russians only, which means that it will fall almost exclusively into the hands of the Russians. A special clause authorized the Czar to station...
Page 66 - In 1/07, they had annexed the peninsula of Kamtchatka. In 1847, Count Nicholas Muravief, who was to win the surname of Amourski, became governor of Eastern Siberia, and set himself to develop and strengthen the colony. He perceived that it would have no future if possession was not secured of the chief river and the richest province of the region, that is, of the Amur and of Manchuria. The river was still so incompletely known that the Grand Chancellor Nesselrode declared to the Emperor Nicholas...
Page 28 - ... streets of that capital. The Liberals made a pretext of the constitutions granted the Roumanians, the Servians, and the Bulgarians, to demand a constitution for Russia. The Panslavist and Liberal agitation had, perhaps, some connection with the rise of another agitation which soon made its appearance, an agitation called Nihilism, of a character entirely revolutionary and subversive, and which fitly terminated on that tragic day of March 13, 1881, when the "Liberator Czar " became the
Page 24 - ... over the Danubian principalities, which were henceforth placed under the collective protectorate of the great powers. When France found herself engaged in a bloody duel with the German Empire, Russia profited by the occasion to have a conference called at London in March, 1871, by which she secured the suppression of article two of the Treaty of Paris, which limited her military power in the Black Sea. The last and the most decisive Russian intervention was the one provoked in 1877 by the Bulgarian...
Page 82 - Asia she has exhibited a prudence wholly Oriental. A score of times it has seemed that she was on the brink of a mighty war with Great Britain over the frontiers of India ; with China over Albasin, Kuldja, or Manchuria ; and with Japan over Liao-tung and Corea. Some sort of an agreement has always come in time to ward off an open rupture, as in 1872, 1885, 1887, and 1895, with Great Britain ; and as at Nertchinsk, at Ai'gun, at Tientsin, and at Pekin with China. In 1871, war with the latter seemed...

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