The Experimental Group: Ilya Kabakov, Moscow Conceptualism, Soviet Avant-Gardes

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University of Chicago Press, Jul 15, 2010 - Art - 316 pages
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A compelling study of unofficial postwar Soviet art, The Experimental Group takes as its point of departure a subject of strange fascination: the life and work of renowned professional illustrator and conceptual artist Ilya Kabakov.

Kabakov’s art—iconoclastic installations, paintings, illustrations, and texts—delicately experiments with such issues as history, mortality, and disappearance, and here exemplifies a much larger narrative about the work of the artists who rose to prominence just as the Soviet Union began to disintegrate. By placing Kabakov and his conceptualist peers in line with our own contemporary perspective, Matthew Jesse Jackson suggests that the art that emerged in the wake of Stalin belongs neither entirely to its lost communist past nor to a future free from socialist nostalgia. Instead, these artists and their work produced a critical and controversial chapter in the as yet unwritten history of global contemporary art.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Dead Souls
9
2 Bureaucratic Expressionism
47
3 Answers of the Experimental Group
93
4 The Rituals of Nonlife
133
5 Kasha and Humanism
169
6 The Man Who Collected the Opinions of Others
203
Conclusion
243
Notes
247
Index
303
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About the author (2010)

Matthew Jesse Jackson teaches in the Departments of Visual Arts and Art History at the University of Chicago. He is also a participant in Our Literal Speed, a series of events in the vicinity of art and history in Europe and North America.

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