The Fall of the House of Labor: The Workplace, the State, and American Labor Activism, 1865-1925

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 27, 1989 - History - 494 pages
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By studying the ways in which American industrial workers mobilized concerted action in their own interest, the author focuses on the workplace itself, examining the codes of conduct developed by different types of workers and the connections between their activity at work and their national origins and neighborhood life. David Montgomery, Farnam Professor of History at Yale University since 1979, is the author of Worker's Control in America (CUP, 1979) and is co-editor of the journal International Labor and Working Class History.
 

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David Montgomery had a unique perspective from which to write The Fall of the House of Labor. Having spent several years in the workforce and involved in labor politics during the 1950s, he saw the ... Read full review

The fall of the house of labor: the workplace, the state, and American labor activism, 1865-1925

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After the Civil War, American workers struggled to gain a voice in how the workplace was run, and to create strong labor unions. Montgomery concentrates on what was happening on the shop floor, rather ... Read full review

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Contents

Acknowledgments
ix
Abbreviations used in text and notes
xi
Introduction
1
The managers brain under the workmans cap
9
The common laborer
58
The operative
112
The art of cutting metals
171
White shirts and superior intelligence
214
Our time believes in change
257
Patriots or paupers
330
This great struggle for democracy
370
A maximum of publicity with a minimum of interference
411
Index
465
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