The Fan-qui in China, in 1836-7, Volume 1

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H. Colburn, 1838 - China
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Page 187 - To sum up the matter,— the wide-spreading and baneful influence of opium, when regarded simply as injurious to property, is of inferior importance ; but when regarded as hurtful to the people, it demands most anxious consideration : for in the people lies the very foundation of the empire. Property, it is true, is that on which the subsistence of the people depends. Yet a deficiency of it may be supplied, and an impoverished people improved ; whereas it is beyond the power of any artificial means...
Page 200 - Since, then, it is manifest that even birds and beasts may be taught to understand human affairs, how much more so may young wives, who, after all, are human beings...
Page 181 - When any one is long habituated to inhaling it, it becomes , necessary to resort to it at regular intervals, and the habit of using it, being inveterate, is destructive of time, injurious to property, and yet dear to one even as life. Of those who use it to great excess, the breath becomes feeble, the body wasted, the face sallow, the teeth black: the individuals themselves clearly see the evil effects of it, yet cannot refrain from it. It is indeed indispensably necessary to enact severe prohibitions...
Page 172 - ... pictures. The son of a gentleman of fortune, his father dying while he was yet but a youth, comes into possession of the whole family estate. The young man having no inclination for either business or books, gives himself up to smoking opium and profligacy. In a little time his whole patrimony is squandered, and he becomes entirely dependent on the labour of his wife and child for his daily food.
Page 212 - ... and the terrors of the empire, in order to eradicate from their minds all their covetous and ambitious schemes. If, notwithstanding, they dare to continue in violent and outrageous opposition, and presume to pass over the allotted bounds, forbearance' must then cease, and a thundering fire from our cannon must be opened upon them, to make them quake before the terror of our arms. In short, the principle on which the ' far-travelled strangers are to be cherished...
Page 211 - Canton, and the anchorage grounds of their merchant-ships and of their naval convoys, regulations have long since been made. If the people aforesaid, will not obey these regulations, and will persist in opposition to the prohibitory enactments, the first step to be taken is, to impress earnestly upon them the plain commands of Government, and to display before them alike both the...
Page 188 - Now the English are of the race of foreigners called Hung-maou. In introducing opium into this country, their purpose has been to weaken and enfeeble the central empire. If not early aroused to a sense of our danger, we shall find ourselves, ere long, on the last step towards ruin.
Page 117 - On the 8th day of the present moon, your youngest brother is to be married. On the 7th, having cleansed the cups, on the 10th he will pour out wine, on which day he will presume to draw to his lowly abode the carriage of his friend. With him he will enjoy the pleasures of conversation, and receive from him instruction for the well-regulating of the feast.
Page 35 - The former is free from all these, and is, perhaps, the most artless and simple of all the religions that ever were taught in the world. It prescribes reverence to an invisible being, residing in the visible heaven, and distributing from thence happiness and misery amongst mankind ; but it enjoins no particular worship to him, so that temples, priests, assemblies, sacrifices, and rites, are things entirely foreign to it. The emperor alone, at certain times, offers a sacrifice to this powerful being...

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