The Federalist Papers

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The Floating Press, Sep 1, 2011 - Political Science - 654 pages
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Perhaps the most essential distillation of the Founders' vision of America, The Federalist Papers consist of a series of 85 essays in favor of the ratification of the U.S. Constitution. Attributed to Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison, the essays tackle an array of topics that are just as relevant today as they were more than 200 years ago, including human rights, republican governance, the proper scope and jurisdiction of a federal government, and much more.
 

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This is a must read considering the dangerous times we live in. Our government is moving a long way away from the Principles in The Federalist Papers. It is the responsibility of every American to ... Read full review

Contents

Federalist No 45
337
Federalist No 46
344
Federalist No 47
353
Federalist No 48
363
Federalist No 49
370
Federalist No 50
376
Federalist No 51
380
Federalist No 52
387

Federalist No 9
58
Federalist No 10
65
Federalist No 11
75
Federalist No 12
83
Federalist No 13
90
Federalist No 14
94
Federalist No 15
101
Federalist No 16
111
Federalist No 17
118
Federalist No 18
124
Federalist No 19
132
Federalist No 20
139
Federalist No 21
145
Federalist No 22
152
Federalist No 23
163
Federalist No 24
169
Federalist No 25
175
Federalist No 26
182
Federalist No 27
190
Federalist No 28
195
Federalist No 29
201
Federalist No 30
208
Federalist No 31
215
Federalist No 32
221
Federalist No 33
226
Federalist No 34
232
Federalist No 35
239
Federalist No 36
246
Federalist No 37
256
Federalist No 38
265
Federalist No 39
275
Federalist No 40
284
Federalist No 41
294
Federalist No 42
306
Federalist No 43
315
Federalist No 44
327
Federalist No 53
393
Federalist No 54
400
Federalist No 55
407
Federalist No 56
414
Federalist No 57
420
Federalist No 58
428
Federalist No 59
435
Federalist No 60
441
Federalist No 61
448
Federalist No 62
453
Federalist No 63
461
Federalist No 64
471
Federalist No 65
479
Federalist No 66
486
Federalist No 67
493
Federalist No 68
499
Federalist No 69
504
Federalist No 70
513
Federalist No 71
524
Federalist No 72
530
Federalist No 73
537
Federalist No 74
545
Federalist No 75
549
Federalist No 76
555
Federalist No 77
561
Federalist No 78
568
Federalist No 79
578
Federalist No 80
582
Federalist No 81
591
Federalist No 82
603
Federalist No 83
608
Federalist No 84
625
Federalist No 85
637
Endnotes
646
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Alexander Hamilton was born on January 11, 1757 on the West Indian Island of Nevis. His mother died in 1769, around the same time his father went bankrupt. Hamilton joined a counting house in St. Croix where he excelled at accounting. From 1772 until 1774, he attended a grammar school in Elizabethtown, New Jersey, and went on to study at King's College. Hamilton entered the Revolutionary movement in 1774 at a public gathering in New York City with a speech urging the calling of a general meeting of the colonies. That same year, he anonymously wrote two pamphlets entitled, A Full Vindication of the Measures of Congress from the Calumnies of Their Enemies and The Farmer Refuted. When the Revolutionary War began, Hamilton joined the army and became a Captain of artillery, where he served with distinction in the battles of Long Island, White Plains, Trenton and Princeton. He was introduced to George Washington by General Nathaniel Greene with a recommendation for advancement. Washington made Hamilton his aide-de-camp and personal secretary. He resigned in 1781 after a dispute with the General, but remained in the army and commanded a New York regiment of light infantry in the Battle of Yorktown. Hamilton left the army at the end of the war, and began studying law in Albany, New York. He served in the Continental Congress in 1782-83, before returning to practice law, becoming one of the most prominent lawyers in New York City. In 1786, Hamilton participated in the Annapolis Convention and drafted the resolution that led to assembling the Constitutional Convention in 1787. He then helped to secure the ratification of the Constitution of New York with the help of John Jay and James Madison, who together wrote the collection of 85 essays which would become known as The Federalist. Hamilton wrote at least 51 of the essays. In 1789, Washington appointed him the first Secretary of the Treasury, a position at which he excelled at and gained a vast influence in domestic and foreign issues, having convinced Washington to adopt a neutral policy when war broke out in Europe in 1793. In 1794, Hamilton wrote the instructions for a diplomatic mission which would lead to the signing of Jay's Treaty. He returned to his law practice in 1795. President John Adams appointed Hamilton Inspector General of the Army at the urging of Washington. He was very much involved with the politics of the country though, and focused his attentions on the presidential race of 1800. Hamilton did not like Aaron Burr and went out of his way to make sure that he did not attain a nomination. Similarly, when Burr ran for mayor of New York, Hamilton set about to ruin his chances for that position as well. Burr provoked an argument with Hamilton to force him to duel. Hamilton accepted and the two met on July 11, 1804 at Weehawken, New Jersey. Hamilton was shot and mortally wounded and died on July 12, 1804.

James Madison, the fourth president of the United States, was born at Port Conway, Virginia. He was raised on a large family farm, called Montpelier, which remained his home throughout his life. After receiving a boarding school education, he entered the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), from which he graduated in 1771. In 1776, Madison was elected a delegate to the Virginia Revolutionary Convention, where he was a strong advocate of religious freedom. He then became a Virginia legislator. As delegate to the Constitutional Convention of 1787, he became the chief architect of the U.S. Constitution and, later, of the Bill of Rights. Madison served in the first Congress from 1789 to 1797, rising to the position of Speaker of the House. In 1801, he became Secretary of State in the administration of Thomas Jefferson, and in 1809, he was elected president. Madison's insights on the nature of politics and the operations of government are as relevant today as they were in his time. His journals provide our principal source of knowledge about the Constitutional Convention of 1787. He also shared the authorship of "The Federalist Papers" (1787-88), arguably the most significant American contribution to political theory, with Alexander Hamilton and John Jay. His insights into political behavior (such as Federalist paper number 10 on the subject of factions) and the nature of government (Federalist papers numbers 39 and 51 on the allocation of power) continue to be useful for those who seek to write constitutions for new governments today.

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