The Field Engineer: A Handy Book of Practice in the Survey, Location, and Track-work of Railroads; Containing a Large Collection of Rules and Tables, Original and Selected, Applicable to Both the Standard and the Narrow Gauge ...

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D. Van Nostrand Company, 1890 - Railroad engineering - 339 pages
 

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Page 18 - ... the square of the hypothenuse is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides.
Page 4 - The logarithm of any power of a number is equal to the logarithm of the number multiplied by the exponent of the power.
Page 11 - Every circumference of a. circle, whether the circle be large or small, is supposed to be divided into 360 equal parts called degrees. Each degree is divided into 60 equal parts called minutes, and each minute into 60 equal parts called seconds.
Page 11 - ... plane triangles. In every plane triangle there are six parts, — three sides and three angles. When three of these parts are given, one being a side, the remaining parts may be found by computation. The operation of finding the unknown parts is called the solution of the triangle.
Page 19 - Call the word written upon each side the name of each side ; then say, As the name of the given side, Is to the given side ; So is the name of the required side, To the required side.
Page 3 - THE LOGARITHM: of a number is the exponent of the power to which it is necessary to raise a fixed number, to produce the given number.
Page 195 - NB The minutes in the left-hand column of each page, increasing downwards, belong to the degrees at the top ; and those increasing upwards, in the right-hand column, belong to the degrees below.
Page i - SHUNK, WF The Field Engineer. A Handy Book of practice in the Survey, Location and Track-work of Railroads, containing a large collection of Rules and Tables, original and selected, applicable to both the Standard and Narrow Gauge, and prepared with special reference to the wants of the young.
Page 19 - To find an angle. Assume one side to be radius, and mark the remaining sides as before. Then say, As the side made radius is to radius, So is the other given side to the name of that side; Which determines the opposite angle.
Page 13 - If the angle is greater than 45, look for the degrees at the bottom of the page, and for the minutes in the right-hand column ; then follow the corresponding...

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