The Fleet, a brief account of the ancient prison called 'The Fleet' in the city of London [by W. Brown].

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1843 - 80 pages
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Page 22 - But forasmuch as he had not to pay, his lord commanded him to be sold and his wife* and children, and all that he had, and payment to be made.
Page 22 - And if thy brother that dwelleth by thee be waxen poor, and be sold unto thee...
Page 22 - Yet now our flesh is as the flesh of our brethren, our children as their children: and, lo, we bring into bondage our sons and our daughters to be servants, and some of our daughters are brought into bondage already: neither is it in our power to redeem them; for other men have our lands and vineyards.
Page 6 - Pretorian power for mitigating the rigour of law, in case of extremity, by the conscience of a good man ; there was nevertheless always reserved a high and pre-eminent power to the King's counsel in causes that might in example or consequence concern the state of the commonwealth...
Page 11 - That an humble address be presented to his majesty, that he would be graciously pleased to direct...
Page 25 - An Act for abolishing arrest on mesne process in civil actions, except in certain cases ; for extending the remedies of creditors against the property of debtors ; and for amending the laws for the relief of insolvent debtors in England.
Page 6 - ... nevertheless always reserved a high and pre-eminent power to the king's council in causes that might in example or consequence concern the state of the commonwealth ; which if they were criminal, the council used to sit in the chamber called the star chamber ; if civil, in the white chamber or white hall.
Page 20 - Richmond, was in 1744 a subject of general conversation; but it was not until 1753 that the law of marriage was taken up with effect, when Lord Hardwicke brought in a Bill, (26 Geo. II. c. 33.) enacting that any person solemnizing matrimony in any other than a church or public chapel, without banns or licence, should on conviction be adjudged guilty of felony, and be transported for fourteen years, and that all such marriages should be void.
Page 14 - Report of the Committee appointed by the House of Commons to enquire into the State of the British Fisheries.
Page 22 - And then shall he depart from thee, both he and his children with him, and shall return unto his own family, and unto the possession of his fathers shall he return.

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