The Florence King Reader

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Macmillan, May 15, 1996 - Fiction - 448 pages
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A volume that will stay in bookstores as long as bile still rankles in the human heart: the collected writings of our smartest, sharpest, and most feared writer--"Miss King" to you! "Simply wonderful. . . . Like H.L. Mencken, whom she resembles in independence and vigorous expression of thought, King cannot write a dull paragraph".--Roger Miller, Milwaukee Journal.
 

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User Review  - purplepen79 - LibraryThing

I've never laughed more while reading than I did reading this--for the first, the second, the third, the fourth times. You know something's funny when you read it for the fourth time and still laugh ... Read full review

Contents

II WASP WHERE IS THY STING?
17
III HE AN IRREVERENT LOOK AT THE AMERICAN MALE
43
IV THE BARBARIAN PRINCESS
55
V WHEN SISTERHOOD WAS IN FLOWER
71
VI CONFESSIONS OF A FAILED SOUTHERN LADY
209
VII BOOK REVIEWS 19841993
233
VIII REFLECTIONS IN A JAUNDICED EYE
267
IX LUMP IT OR LEAVE IT
279
X THE MISANTHROPES CORNER NATIONAL REVIEW COLUMNS
301
XI THE OPEN BOOK RALEIGH NEWS OBSERVER COLUMNS
335
XII UNCOLLECTED ARTICLES
353
XIII WITH CHARITY TOWARD NONE A FOND LOOK AT MISANTHROPY
381
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About the author (1996)

Florence Virginia King was born in Washington, D. C. on January 5, 1936. She received a bachelor's degree in history from American University. After college, she trained briefly for the Marines before entering graduate school at the University of Mississippi. She left graduate school after she discovered she could earn $250 an article writing first-person stories for pulp magazines like Uncensored Confessions. She wrote more than 100 articles. When the pulps became less popular, she started writing erotic novels under a series of pseudonyms including The Barbarian Princess by Laura Buchanan. In the 1960s, she was a feature writer for The Raleigh News and Observer in North Carolina. Her first book under her own name was the nonfiction title Southern Ladies and Gentlemen, which was published in 1975. Her other nonfiction books include He: An Irreverent Look at the American Male, Reflections in a Jaundiced Eye, Lump It or Leave It, and With Charity Toward None: A Fond Look at Misanthropy. She also wrote a memoir entitled Confessions of a Failed Southern Lady and an anthology entitled The Florence King Reader. She wrote two columns for the National Review entitled Misanthrope's Corner and The Bent Pin. She also wrote book criticism for Newsday and The New York Times. She died on January 6, 2015 at the age of 80.

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