The Flower, the Thing: A Book of Flowers and Dedications

Front Cover
Macmillan, 2006 - Poetry - 122 pages
0 Reviews
From the Winner of the 2005 Victorian Premier's Literary Award for poetry

There is a goblet of lichen
for the sun to feed from
and a single wild iris
with a mind so old
that it came before invention
Its condition is perfect
It rests perfectly between
our hands

– from “Wild Iris”

MTC Cronin's poems - expansive and intimate, dynamic and reflective - blaze with electrifying vision. Writing with honesty and wit, grace, and the courage to strip away illusions, she explores surfaces, interiors, myths and mysteries through a kaleidoscope of flowers - dandelions, impatiens, roses, azaleas, flowers real and imagined. Suffused with awe and wonder, these poems unveil 'urgently, now, before us, the flower, the thing'.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Acacia
1
Camellia
14
Flannel Flowers
27
Flowers Eavesdropping
30
Freesia
36
Grape Hyacinth
42
Island Flowers
48
Leis
54
Lotus
60
Magnolia Tree
61
Oleander Adelpha
74
Primula
87
Slipper Flowers
93
Veronica
106
Wreath
119
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

David Dyergrew up in a coastal town in NSW, Australia, and graduated as dux of his high school in 1984. After commencing a degree in medicine and surgery at the University of Sydney, he soon decided it was not for him.

David went on to train as a ship's officer at the Australian Maritime College, travelling Australia and the world in a wide range of merchant ships. He graduated from the college with distinction and was awarded a number of prizes, including the Company of Master Mariners Award for highest overall achievement in the course. He then returned to the University of Sydney to complete a combined degree in Arts and Law. David was awarded the Frank Albert Prize for first place in Music I, High Distinctions in all English courses and First Class Honours in Law. From the mid-1990s until early 2000s David worked as a litigation lawyer in Sydney, and then in London at a legal practice whose parent firm represented the Titanic's owners back in 1912. In 2002 David returned to Australia and obtained a Diploma in Education from the University of New England, and commenced teaching English at Kambala, a school for girls in Sydney's eastern suburbs.

David has had a life-long obsession with the Titanic and has become an expert on the subject. In 2009 he was awarded a Commonwealth Government scholarship to write The Midni

Bibliographic information