The Food Our Children Eat: How to Get Children to Like Good Food

Front Cover
HarperCollins Publishers, Sep 27, 2012 - Cooking - 320 pages

A majority of British children mainly eat processed and junk food. Award-winning food writer Joanna Blythman takes a controversial look at this curious phenomenon and offers parents practical tips on how to improve their children’s diet.

Written in a highly accessible way, The Food Our Children Eat offers practical tips for parents who are concerned about what their children eat and looks at the long term consequences for human health and society of the increase in consumption of junk food. Joanna Blythman suggests strategies for ensuring our children eat more healthily, both at home and at school, with invaluable advice about how to interest children in nutritious food.

This well-researched and fascinating book also discusses the impact of our eating habits on the younger generation and attacks the complacency that surrounds the emergence of separate kids’ food and mealtimes. The Food Our Children Eat explores the decline in the standard of food children eat and is an intriguing polemic on what we can do to improve it.

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About the author (2012)

Joanna Blythman is Britain’s leading investigative food journalist and an influential commentator on the British food chain. She has won five Glenfiddich Awards for her writing, including a Glenfiddich Special Award for her first book, The Food We Eat, and the Glenfiddich Food Book of the Year Award in 2005 for Shopped, as well as a Caroline Walker Media Award for ‘Improving the Nation’s Health by Means of Good Food’, and a Guild of Food Writers Award for The Food We Eat. In 2004 she won the prestigious Derek Cooper Award, one of BBC Radio 4’s Food and Farming Awards. She has also written two other groundbreaking books, How to Avoid GM Food and The Food Our Children Eat. She writes and broadcasts frequently on food issues.

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