The Four Gospels and the One Gospel of Jesus Christ

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Bloomsbury Academic, Jul 1, 2000 - Religion - 368 pages
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Why did the church, in forming its canon of scripture, choose to include four different and sometimes contradictory accounts of the life of Jesus, when others, like Tatian and Marcion, opted for a harmony, for one account? Professor Hengel examines the external historical evidence for the creation of the Gospels by those documenting the early church, like Papias and Ireneus. He also analyzes the origin of the uniform title "Gospel according to" and the process of dissemination of the gospel. He concludes that whether for the evangelists or for Paul, the gospel is both narrative and proclamation. Despite the problems caused by the different forms in which the gospel has come down to us, this very multiplicity remains a source of strength for the church. Martin Hengel is Emeritus Professor of New Testament and Early Judaism at the University of Tubingen.

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Contents

Serapion of Antioch and the Gospel of Peter
12
The Four Gospels Their Authors and the
34
The superscriptions of the Gospels and the Gospel
48
Gospel commentaries and apocryphal
57
Papias note about Mark and Matthew
65
Gospel and the tension between oral
73
The Origin of
116
Written and oral tradition in Clement of Rome
128
Peter and the narrated Gospel
153
The priority of the Gospel reading over
161
Reflections on the Logia Source
169
The chronological priority of the Gospel
186
Summary
205
Index of References to the Bible and Early
324
Index of Modern Authors
345
General Index
351

The significance of the Roman book cupboard
136
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Martin Hengel is Emeritus Professor of New Testament and Ancient Judaism, University of Tübingen, Germany.

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