The Fourth Part of the Institutes of the Laws of England: Concerning the Jurisdiction of Courts

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The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 1817 - History - 478 pages
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Reprint of the last and best edition with Butler and Hargrave's notes, and with mistakes corrected from the 1681 folio edition. Hardcover, [xiv], [1], 364, [49] pp. Paging irregular; star-paged to 1681 folio edition. Originally published: London: Printed for W. Clarke and Sons, 1817. For this Institute Coke gathered miscellaneous materials that were not in the first three Institutes, and included translations of ancient statutes that appeared in the earlier Institutes in the original Latin or Law French, with notes and references to later authorities cited by Butler and Hargrave. The Fourth Part outlines the authority and jurisdictions of the Court of Star-Chamber, Kings Court, Chancery, the Court of Common Pleas, Ecclesiastical Courts, Courts of Exchequer, Augmentations, Admiralty, the Justices Assise, Courts in Universities of Cambridge and Oxford, Court of the Commissioners Upon the Statute of Bankrupts, the Marshalsea, the Stannaries, the Eighteen Courts of the City of London, the Court of Pipowders (concerning Markets and Fairs), the Courts of the Forest Countries, various ecclesiastical courts and many more.
Sir Edward Coke [1552-1643] was considered to be the greatest legal practitioner of his day. He is known for writing Law Reports, also referred to as Coke's Reports. They were an archive of law reports of cases he contributed in, watched, or was familiar with. They started with the notes he made as a law student in 1572. He started fully reporting cases in October 1579. Coke never officially published his entire Reports during his lifetime. Select cases were published in 1600. Coke's challenge to the ecclesiastical courts is seen as the origin to the right to silence.
 

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Contents

I
II
52
IV
52
V
60
VI
66
VII
70
VIII
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IX
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XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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XLI
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XLII
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XLIII
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XLV
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XLVI
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XLVII
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X
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XI
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XIII
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XIV
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XVI
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XVII
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XVIII
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XIX
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XXI
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXV
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XXVI
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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XXXV
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XXXVI
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XXXVII
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XLVIII
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XLIX
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L
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LI
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LII
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LIII
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LIV
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LV
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LVI
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LVII
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LVIII
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LX
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LXI
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LXII
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LXIII
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LXV
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LXVI
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LXVII
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LXVIII
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LXIX
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LXX
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LXXI
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LXXII
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LXXIII
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Page 26 - although proclamation be not made in the county, every one is bound to take notice of that which is done in parliament ; for as soon as the parliament hath concluded anything, the law intends that every person hath notice thereof, for the parliament represents the body of the whole realm, and therefore it is not requisite that any proclamation be made, seeing the statute took effect before.
Page 37 - It is not the manner of the Romans to deliver any man to die, before that he which is accused have the accusers face to face, and have licence to answer for himself concerning the crime laid against him.

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