The Future of Life

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Vintage Books, 2003 - Nature - 229 pages
8 Reviews
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Eloquent, practical and wise, this book by one of the world's most important scientists--and two time Pulitzer Prize winner--should be read and studied by anyone concerned with the fate of the natural world. It makes one thing clear ... we know what we do, and we have a choice (The New York Times Book Review).

E.O. Wilson assesses the precarious state of our environment, examining the mass extinctions occurring in our time and the natural treasures we are about to lose forever. Yet, rather than eschewing doomsday prophesies, he spells out a specific plan to save our world while there is still time. His vision is a hopeful one, as economically sound as it is environmentally necessary.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - GlennBell - LibraryThing

The author is knowledgeable and the book is well written. The topic is one-dimensional in that the basic concept is that humans are causing extinction of many species. He covers the magnitude of the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Paul_S - LibraryThing

A strange book. A kind of cry of anguish and plea for sanity. In my humble unsolicited opinion the problem and major shortcoming of environmentalists is that instead of advocating reasonable self ... Read full review

Contents

CHAPTERI TO THE ENDS OF EARTH
3
THE BOTTLENECK
22
NATURES LAST STAND
42
THE PLANETARY KILLER
79
HOW MUCH IS THE BIOSPHERE WORTH?
103
FOR THE LOVE OF LIFE
129
THE SOLUTION
149
Notes
191
Glossary
213
Acknowledgments
219
Index
221
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Edward O. Wilson is the author of two Pulitzer Prize-winning books, On Human Nature (1978) and The Ants (1990, with Bert Hölldobler), as well as many other groundbreaking works, including Consilience, Naturalist, and Sociobiology. A recipient of many of the world's leading prizes in science and conservation, he is currently Pellegrino University Research Professor and Honorary Curator in Entomology of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University. He lives in Lexington, Massachusetts, with his wife, Renee.

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