The General History of China: Containing a Geographical, Historical, Chronological, Political and Physical Descritpion of the Empire of China, Chinese-Tartary, Corea, and Thibet. Including an Exact and Particular Account of Their Customs, Manners, Ceremonies, Religion, Arts and Sciences ...

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J. Watts, 1741 - China
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Contents

I
II
29
III
33
IV
57
V
59
VI
61
VII
72
VIII
101
XXVI
269
XXVII
286
XXVIII
298
XXIX
313
XXX
339
XXXI
346
XXXIII
367
XXXIV
369

IX
109
X
132
XI
150
XII
162
XIII
191
XIV
204
XV
214
XVI
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XVII
223
XVIII
226
XIX
232
XXI
236
XXIII
251
XXIV
256
XXV
264
XXXV
375
XXXVI
379
XXXVII
381
XXXVIII
384
XXXIX
387
XL
389
XLI
414
XLII
415
XLIII
417
XLIV
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XLV
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XLVI
422
XLVII
443
XLVIII
451
XLIX
480

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Page 114 - Crimes mould be committed with any manner of Impunity. All the great Streets, which are drawn by a Line from one Gate to another, have feveral Corps de Garde. Night and Day the Soldiers, with their Swords by their Sides, and Whips in their Hands, are ready to chaftife thofe who make any Difturbance ; they have Power to take into Cuftody whoever refifts or creates any Quarrel.
Page 22 - ... information in this quotation: But the Mountains of China are still more valuable for the Mines of different metals which they contain. They are full, as the Nations affirm, of silver and gold. Yet they have been hitherto neglected out of Policy, because the Repose of the Publick would be disturbed by too much Riches, which would make the people proud and negligent of Agriculture.
Page 21 - Europe anything like it. The liveliness of the red and yellow, the plume on the head, the delicate shadowing of the tail, the variety of colours of the wings, together with a well-shaped body, have doubtless given occasion for the epithet of Golden conferred on this fowl, to show its preference over the most valuable of the feathered kind ;— besides, the flesh is more delicate than that of a pheasant, so that on all accounts not one of the eastern birds can be more desirable...
Page 118 - Tiles of fuch a beautiful Yellow, that at a Diftance they appear almoft as bright as if they were gilt : Another Roof as bright as the former fprings from the Walls, and ranges all round the Buildings, and this is fupported by a Foreft of Beams, Joifts and...
Page 118 - Diftance they appear almoft as bright as if they were gilt. Another Roof, as bright as the former, fprings from the Walls, and ranges all round the Buildings; and this is fupported by a Foreft of Beams, Joifts and Spars, alljapann'd with gold Flowers on a green Ground.
Page 11 - This varnifh is conftantly ufed, and greatly efteemcd by the artificers; it takes all colours alike, and if it be well managed, neither lofes its luftre by the changes of the air, nor the age of the
Page 315 - TcheonKong gave them an instrument, which on one side pointed to the north, and the opposite side to ihe south, to direct them better on their way home than they had been directed in coming to China. The instrument was called TchiNan, which is the same as the Chinese now give to the sea-compass ; and this has given occasion to think that Tclieon-Kong was the inventor of the compnes. This happened in the 22d cycle, more than 1040 years before the Christian era.
Page 274 - ... em the four cardinal points; by this method he overtook Tchi Yeou, made him prisoner, and put him to death. Some say there were engraved in this carr, on a plate, the characters of a rat and a horse, and underneath was placed a needle, to determine the four parts of the world. This would amount to the use of the compass, or " something very near it, being of great " antiquity, aiid well attested. Tis pity " this contrivance is not explained, but the " interpreters knowing only the bare fact "...
Page 25 - Canals. the greateft Advantage to the Publick ; infomuch that one may pafs . from Canton the moft Southern City, to Peking the moft Northern, without travelling above one Day by Land, and even not that, if one goes a little about by the Province of Quang fi and Hou quang.
Page 115 - Streets : the Lattice Gates are fhut at Night by the Corps de Garde, and are feldom opened but to Perfons known, who carry a Lanthorn in their Hand, and who give a good Reafon for coming out, fuch as it would be to fetch a Phyfician. As foon as the firft Stroke is given by the Watch on a great Bell, a Soldier or two come and go from one Corps de Garde to the other, ^and as they walk along they play continually on a fort of Rattle. They do not fuffer any Perfon to go about at Night, and they examine...

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