The Genesis of Science: How the Christian Middle Ages Launched the Scientific Revolution

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Regnery Publishing, Mar 22, 2011 - Science - 448 pages
3 Reviews

The Not-So-Dark Dark Ages

What they forgot to teach you in school:
People in the Middle Ages did not think the world was flat
The Inquisition never executed anyone because of their scientific ideologies
It was medieval scientific discoveries, including various methods, that made possible Western civilization’s “Scientific Revolution”

As a physicist and historian of science James Hannam debunks myths of the Middle Ages in his brilliant book The Genesis of Science: How the Christian Middle Ages Launched the Scientific Revolution. Without the medieval scholars, there would be no modern science.

Discover the Dark Ages and their inventions, research methods, and what conclusions they actually made about the shape of the world.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - hardlyhardy - LibraryThing

The Dark Ages weren't nearly as dark as we have been led to believe. So argues James Hannam in his 2009 book "The Genesis of Science: How the Christian Middles Ages Launched the Scientific Revolution ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ffortsa - LibraryThing

Although this was an interesting survey of scientific thinking before 1500, Hannam works his thesis a little too hard, and sometimes a little too meanly. Science in our meaning of the word was rather ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter
1
Chapter
14
Arnold Berckmann 1539
32
The Rise of Reason
35
Manuscript illumination by Laurentius de Voltolina from the Kupfer
45
The TwelfthCentury Renaissance
53
Manuscript illumination from Bible Moralisee Vienna Österreichische
59
Heresy and Reason
69
The Polymaths of the Sixteenth Century
229
Medicine and Anatomy
247
Zuane
254
Humanist Astronomy and Nicolaus Copernicus
267
Reforming the Heavens
283
Model of the universe from Johannes Kepler Mysterium cosmographicam
293
Galileo and Giordano Bruno
303
Galileo and the New Astronomy
317

Manuscript initial from Johannitius Isagoge Bethesda MA National
78
How Pagan Science Was Christianized
83
Magic and Medicine
101
Roger Bacon and the Science of Light
129
Photograph of a large trebuchet
132
Richard of Wallingford
147
Eastern and western Arabic numerals compared to modern western
153
The Merton Calculators
161
The Apogee of Medieval Science
177
Diagram from Nicole Oresmes De configurationibus qualitatum Flor
184
New Horizons
193
Humanism and the Reformation
209
The Trial and Triumph of Galileo
329
A diagram from William Heytesbury Regule solvendi sophismata
339
A Scientific Revolution?
345
Suggestions for Further Reading
353
Timeline
357
List of Key Characters
361
Notes
373
Bibliography of Works Cited
411
Acknowledgements
439
Index
441
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

JAMES HANNAM is a graduate of both Oxford and Cambridge where he studied physics and then gained a Ph.D. in the history of science. He lives in England with his wife and two children.

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