The Genuine Works of Flavius Josephus, the Learned and Authentic Jewish Historian, and Celebrated Warrior, Volume 6

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David Huntington, 1815 - Jews
 

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Page 94 - Eleazar, the son of Ananias the high priest, a very bold youth, who was at that time governor of the temple, persuaded those that officiated in the divine service to receive no gift or sacrifice for any foreigner. And this was the true beginning of our war with the Romans...
Page 220 - These things were a manifest indication that some destruction was coming upon men, when the system of the world was put into this disorder, and any one would guess that these wonders foreshewed some grand calamities that were coming.
Page 112 - It then happened that Cestius was not conscious either how the besieged despaired of success, nor how courageous the people were for him ; and so he recalled his soldiers from the place, and by despairing of any expectation of taking it, without having received any disgrace, he retired from the city, without any reason in the world.
Page 50 - These men are despisers of riches and so very communicative as raises our admiration. Nor is there anyone to be found among them who hath more than another; for it is a law among them that those who come to them must let what they have be common to the whole order...
Page 138 - As for what is withia the camp it is set apart for tents, but the outward circumference hath the resemblance to a wall, and is adorned with towers at equal distances, where between the towers stand the engines for throwing arrows, and darts, and for slinging stones, and where they lay all other engines that can annoy the enemy, all ready for their several operations. They also erect four gates, one at every side of the circumference...
Page 138 - Nor can their enemies easily surprise them with the suddenness of their incursions ; for as soon as they have marched into an enemy's land, they do not begin to fight till they have walled their camp about ; nor is the fence they raise rashly made or uneven ; nor do they all abide in it, nor do those that are in it take their places at random ; but if it happens that the ground is uneven, it is first levelled...
Page 241 - It was of old a most happy land, both for the fruits it bore and the riches of its cities, although it be now all burnt up. It is related how, for the impiety of its inhabitants, it was burnt by lightning; in consequence of which there are still the remainders of that divine fire, and the traces [or shadows] of the five cities are still to be seen, as well as the ashes growing in their fruits; which fruits have a color as if they were fit to be eaten, but if you pluck them with your hands, they dissolve...
Page 182 - ... expect in so diffuse a place as this is ; now when this water is kept in the open air, it is as cold as that snow which the country people are accustomed to make by night in summer.
Page 50 - Coponius, one of the equestrian order among the Romans, was sent as a procurator, having the power of (life and) death put into his hands by Caesar.
Page 223 - Nay, they proceeded to that degree of impiety, as to cast away their dead bodies without burial, although the Jews used to take so much care of the burial of men, that they took down those that were condemned and crucified, and buried them before the going down of the sun.

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