The Georgian Era: Military and naval commanders. Judges and barristers. Physicians and surgeons

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Vizetelly, Branston, 1833 - Great Britain
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Page 277 - No man ever spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was lest he should make an end.
Page 335 - ... so vigorous, that detail itself becomes interesting. He introduces every question with perspicuity, states it with precision, and pursues it with easy unaffected method. Sometimes, perhaps, he may amuse his readers with excursions into paradox ; but he never bewilders them by flights into romance. " His philosophy is far more just, and far more amiable, than the philosophy of Paine, and his eloquence is only not equal to the eloquence of Burke. He is argumentative without sophistry, fervid without...
Page 333 - In the court where we are now met, Cromwell twice sent a satirist on his tyranny to be convicted and punished as a libeller ; and in this court, almost in sight of the scaffold streaming with the blood of his sovereign, within hearing of the clash of his bayonets which drove out...
Page 229 - I am going fast; it will be all over with me soon. Come nearer to me. Let my dear Lady Hamilton have my hair and all other things belonging to me.
Page 355 - The course is clear before us ; the race is glorious to run. You have the power of sending your name down through all times, illustrated by deeds of higher fame, and more useful import, than ever were done within these walls. You saw the greatest warrior of the age — conqueror of Italy — humbler of Germany — terror of the North — saw him account all his matchless victories poor, compared with the triumph you are now in a condition to win — saw him contemn the fickleness of Fortune...
Page 295 - No one venerates the peerage more than I do ; but, my lords, I must say, that the peerage solicited me, not I the peerage. Nay, more — I can say, and will say, that as a peer of parliament, as speaker of this right honorable house, as keeper of the great seal, as guardian of his majesty's conscience, as lord high chancellor of England, nay, even in that character alone, in which the...
Page 424 - While the vaccine discovery was progressive, the joy I felt at the prospect before me of being the instrument destined to take away from the world one of its greatest calamities, blended with the fond hope of enjoying independence and domestic peace and happiness, was often so excessive that, in pursuing my favorite subject among the meadows, I have sometimes found myself in a kind of reverie.
Page 355 - ... the emoluments superfluous to one content with the rest of his industrious fellow-citizens, that his own hands minister to his wants : And as for the power supposed to follow it — I have lived near half a century, and I have learned that power and place may be severed. But one power I do prize ; that of being the advocate of my countrymen here, and their fellow-labourer elsewhere, in those things which concern the best interests of mankind. That power, I know full well, no government can give...
Page 353 - ... rends its kindred throne! You have said, my lords, you have willed — the Church and the king have willed — that the queen should be deprived of its solemn service. She has, instead of that solemnity, the heartfelt prayers of the people. She wants no prayers of mine. But I do here pour forth my humble...
Page 229 - Nelson now desired to be turned upon his right side, and said, " I wish I had not left the deck ; for I shall soon be gone.