The Gilded Age: a tale of to-day, volume two

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Harper & Brothers, 1915 - 360 pages
 

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A fabulous book, wonderfully written by Mr Twain and Mr. Warner. Even though the book was written over 135 years ago, it is apparent that the motivations of people never change, nor do their schemes. This book had me laughing out loud at times, and causing me to examine our present leaders and economic situation and marvel at how history does, in fact, repeat itself. 

Contents

I
5
II
14
III
38
IV
46
V
56
VI
64
VII
70
VIII
80
XIX
205
XX
218
XXI
228
XXII
232
XXIII
242
XXIV
253
XXV
265
XXVI
278

IX
88
X
97
XI
108
XII
130
XIII
137
XIV
147
XV
162
XVI
173
XVII
183
XVIII
194
XXVII
287
XXVIII
298
XXIX
314
XXX
324
XXXI
334
XXXII
342
XXXIII
351
XXXIV
355
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Page 14 - ... in the nation's councils and its wars from the birth of the republic downward. Into this select circle it was difficult to gain admission. No. 2 was the aristocracy of the middle ground — of which, more anon. No. 3 lay beyond ; of it we will say a word here. We will call it the Aristocracy of the Parvenus — as, indeed, the general public did. Official position, no matter how obtained, entitled a man to a place in it, and carried his family with him, no matter whence they sprang. Great wealth...
Page 215 - With faire discourse the evening so they pas: For that olde man of pleasing wordes had store, And well could file his tongue as smooth as glas, He told of Saintes and Popes, and evermore He strowd an Ave-Mary after and before.
Page 341 - Let not them that are mine enemies wrongfully rejoice over me: neither let them wink with the eye that hate me without a cause.

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