The Godless Constitution: The Case Against Religious Correctness

Front Cover
The Godless Constitution is an urgent and timely reexamination of the roots of church-state separation in American politics - and a ringing refutation of the misguided claims of the religious right. In this important polemic two distinguished scholars of American political ideas and religion refute this dangerous attempt to introduce what they term "religious correctness" into our politics, by reminding us that the absence of any mention of God in the Constitution was a conscious action on the framers' part, intended to prevent the bloody religious controversies that so marked European history. They also emphasize that church-state separation was seen as a guarantee of - not a hindrance to - religions liberty. Fully respecting the importance of religion in the public sphere, yet forthright in defining proper limits, The Godless Constitution offers a bracing return to the first principles of American democracy - and a guide to keeping them intact in the forthcoming presidential campaign.
 

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User Review  - Devil_llama - www.librarything.com

This is a good, well-researched look at the history of the religion clauses in the First Amendment, and a great corrective to those who feel certain that we are merely given the freedom to choose what ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - quantum_flapdoodle - www.librarything.com

This is a good, well-researched look at the history of the religion clauses in the First Amendment, and a great corrective to those who feel certain that we are merely given the freedom to choose what ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction to the Paperback Edition
7
The Godless Constitution
26
Roger Williams and the Religious Argument
46
CHAPTER4 The English Roots of the Secular State
67
The Infidel Mr Jefferson
88
American Baptists and the Jeffersonian
110
Sunday Mail and the Christian Amendment
131
Religious Politics and Americas Moral
150
A Note on Sources
179
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

R. Laurence Moore is Howard A. Newman Professor of American Studies and History at Cornell University.

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